Monthly Archives: June 2013

Sunday, June 30, 2013

A children’s story that can only be enjoyed by children is not a good children’s story in the slightest.” 
― C.S. Lewis

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The National Organization for Women (NOW) is an organization founded in 1966. It has a membership of 550,000 contributing members set up for the advancement of women. The organization consists of 550 chapters in all 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia. NOW was founded on June 30, 1966, in Washington, D.C., by 28 women and men attending the Third National Conference of State Commissions on the Status of Women, the successor to the Presidential Commission on the Status of Women. The founders included Betty Friedan (the author of The Feminine Mystique (1963), who was also NOW’s first president), Rev. Pauli Murray, the first African-American female Episcopal priest, and Shirley Chisholm, the first Black woman to run for president of the United States of America. In 1968 NOW issued a Bill of Rights which they had adopted at their 1967 national conference, which advocated the passage of the Equal Rights Amendment, enforcement of the prohibitions against sex discrimination in employment under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, maternity leave rights in employment and in Social Security benefits, tax deduction for home and child care expenses for working parents, child day care centers, equal and non-gender-segregated education, equal job training opportunities and allowances for women in poverty, and the right of women to control their reproductive lives. In 1971 NOW expanded its agenda to include lesbian rights. NOW stands against all oppression, recognizing that racism, sexism and homophobia are interrelated, that other forms of oppression such as classism and ableism work together with these three to keep power and privilege concentrated in the hands of a few.” The six core issues that NOW addresses are abortion rights/reproductive issues, violence against women, constitutional equality, promoting diversity/ending racism, lesbian rights, and economic justice. NOW also works on the issues of affirmative action, disability rights, family law, global feminism, health and body image, immigration, judicial nominations, same-sex marriage, media activism, mothers/caregivers economic rights, Title IX/education, welfare, promoting women-friendly workplaces, women in the military, young feminist programs and more. According to NOW’s bylaws, NOW’s primary focus is on domestic American issues; however, NOW does some work on other issues of importance to women and children globally. These issues include genocide in Africa. NOW is also a coalition member with other feminist groups whose mission is global feminism.

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We sure hope that the weather in your area calls for clear skies tonight. Today is Meteor Watch Day, a time to look to the skies for meteor showers. The word “meteor” stands for the vibrant visible streak of light generated by fallen debris from space—”meteoroids.” These are also termed as “shooting stars” or “falling stars.” Will you be lucky enough to see meteors streaking across the night sky? We sure hope so. Meteors are space dust and ice that enter the earth’s atmosphere. Meteors can be as small as specks of dust. As they enter the atmosphere at high speeds, they burn up, producing light as they streak across the night sky. Sometimes, you see them streak across the sky and disappear at the horizon. Other times, they end suddenly, burning out right before your eyes. With a little luck, you can see a meteor just about any night of the year. But, the best times to see meteors is during a meteor shower. There are a number of them each year. The best annual show is the Perseid Meteor shower each August. An explosion illuminated the sky on June 30, 1908, over Siberia, which is probably the origin of Meteor Day. Seen from hundreds of miles, the incident is attributed to a meteor and is termed as the “Siberian Explosion.” The incident is also considered as the “Tunguska event,” as the meteor is believed to have busted over the Tunguska River. The estimated strength is 1,000 times greater than the atomic bomb dropped over Hiroshima. The Tunguska incident leveled entire trees over 40 kilometers away and trembled the ground in a tremendous earthquake as stated by NASA.

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The U.S. Congress organized the Michigan Territory on this day in 1805.

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U.S. President Abraham Lincoln granted Yosemite Valley to California for “public use, resort and recreation” on June 30, 1864.

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On this day in 1882, Charles J. Guiteau was hanged for the assassination of U.S. President James Garfield.

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On June 30, 1905, Albert Einstein published the article On the Electrodynamics of Moving Bodies, in which he introduced special relativity.

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The United States Congress passed the Meat Inspection Act and Pure Food and Drug Act on this day in 1906.

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The world’s first emergency telephone number, 999, was introduced in London on June 30, 1937.

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The first Chevrolet Corvette rolled off the assembly line in Flint, Michigan sixty years ago today.

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Ohio ratified the 26th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution on June 30, 1971, reducing the voting age to 18, thereby putting the amendment into effect.

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Some of the writers born June 30th include:

John Gay (1685), Thomas Lovell Beddoes (1803), Friedrich Theodor von Vischer (1807), Georges Duhamel (1884), Winston Graham (1908), Czesław Miłosz (1911), James Goldman (1927), Thomas Sowell (1930), Assia Djebar (1936), José Emilio Pacheco (1939), Saeed Akhtar Mirza (1943), Ahmed Sofa (1943), Daniel Goldhagen (1959), Julianne Regan (1962), and Fantasia Barrino (1984).

Great Sky Woman

Our special today is Great Sky Woman, a novel by Steven Barnes. This is the first edition hardcover. We are lowering our price for one week only on this so get it quick.

From Booklist:

This prehistorical novel set in Africa introduces readers to the Ibandi, a peaceful tribe living in the shadow of Mount Kilimanjaro, or the Great Sky Mountain. When their lives are interrupted by invasions from a brutal neighboring tribe, it falls to two youngsters, Frog Hopping, the third son of a hunter, and T’Cori, an apprentice herb woman, to climb the Great Sky Mountain and seek help from Father Sky. Barnes does a magnificent job of thoroughly grounding his engaging characters in the practical and mystical details of daily life in ancient Africa. An adventure on a grand scale, this initial installment in a projected two-volume series cleverly sets the stage for further action and will leave readers craving more. Margaret Flanagan
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

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Disclaimer:
Much of the information in this blog is taken directly from Wikipedia, Amazon, and other sources such as holidayinsights.com, which are directly linked to within the text. Images have been taken from various sources found via Facebook, Goodsearch.com and Google.
Village Book Shop and the blogger claim no credit for the information above.

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Saturday, June 29, 2013

In a good bookroom you feel in some mysterious way that you are absorbing the wisdom contained in all the books through your skin, without even opening them.” 
― Mark Twain

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Congratulations, you have made it 180 days into the year. That means we are almost half way there! Only 185 days left of 2013.

Tour de France begins today and continues through Juily 21st. The Tour de France is an annual multiple stage bicycle race primarily held in France, while also occassionally making passes through nearby countries. The race was first organized in 1903 to increase paper sales for the magazine L’Auto; it is currently run by the Amaury Sport Organisation. The race has been held annually since its first edition in 1903 except for when it was stopped for the two World Wars. As the Tour gained prominence and popularity the race was lengthened and its reach began to extend around the globe. Participation expanded from a primarily French field, as riders from all over the world began to participate in the race each year. The Tour is a UCI World Tour event, which means that the teams that compete in the race are mostly UCI ProTeams, with the exception of the teams that the organizers invite. While the route changes each year, the format of the race stays the same with the appearance of at least two time trials, the passage through the mountain chains of the Pyrenees and the Alps, and the finish on the Champs-Élysées. The modern editions of the Tour de France consist of 21 day-long segments (stages) over a 23-day period and cover around 3,200 kilometres (2,000 mi). The race alternates between clockwise and anticlockwise circuits of France. The number of teams usually varies between 20 and 22, with nine riders in each. All of the stages are timed to the finish; after finishing the riders’ times are compounded with their previous stage times. The rider with the lowest aggregate time is the leader of the race and gets to don the coveted yellow jersey. The 2013 Tour de France will be the 100th Tour de France. It is scheduled to start in Corsica, in the city of Porto-Vecchio. The island will host the first three stages. The tour will be the first to be completed only on French soil since 1988. It will feature a final set of stages which have been described as “brutal“, including three Alpine stages in the last week along with a “viciously hard” time trial.

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Today is National Camera Day. Derived from the Greek words “light” and “writing,” photography has “developed” over the years. Camera Day is best celebrated with pictures. Pictures are invaluable memories of our lives and of the world. They tell stories. With digital technology, using a camera has never been easier. Cameras are now built into cell phones, so you always have a camera with you, ready to record the moments of your life. To many people, a camera is a vital tool to record important events in the family and in the world. It captures the moment…..forever. It creates the memories that we share and look back upon. From the birth of a baby, to high school graduations, people take pictures at a fast click. Year after year, the camera records family vacations, holidays and Christmas. The camera takes pictures of good times, and occasionally bad times. In 1827, Joseph Niepce created the first photographic image with a camera obscura. The process required 8 hours of light exposure that eventually faded. In 1839, Louis Jacques Daguerre took the first fixed image that didn’t fade. His method required about 30 minutes of exposure. He named the process after himself – the Daguerreotype. Tintypes were developed in 1856 by Hamilton Smith and decades later, George Eastman invented flexible and unbreakable film that could be rolled. George Eastman is often called the “Father of Photography”. He didn’t invent photography. He made many photographic inventions, and created the mass production that brought cameras into everyday use by millions, if not billions of people. His most famous slogan “You take the picture, we do the rest.”

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June 29th is National Waffle Iron Day. Waffle irons originated in Belgium during the 14th century. These early contraptions consisted of two metal plates hinged together. The plates were then attached to a long pole, which allowed the cook to hold the iron over an open fire. In 1869, a man named Cornelius Swarthout patented the first American waffle iron. This device was designed for cooking over the burner of a wood or gas stove. Fifty years later, General Electric began producing the first electric waffle irons for everyday use. Today is an important celebration for all the breakfast lovers of the world. Homemade waffles are one of the cornerstones of a delicious morning meal, and the waffle iron makes it all possible. To celebrate National Waffle Iron Day, whip up some waffle batter and have breakfast-for-dinner tonight! Top your homemade waffles with syrup, whipped cream, fruit, chocolate, or even fried chicken. Bon appétit!

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Father Francisco Palou founded Mission San Francisco de Asis on June 29, 1776 in what is now San Francisco, California.

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On this day in 1956, the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956 was signed, officially creating the United States Interstate Highway System.

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On June 29, 1972, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in the case Furman v Georgia that arbitrary and inconsistent imposition of the death penalty violates the Eighth and Fourteenth Amendments, and constitutes cruel and unusual punishment.

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On this day in 2007, Apple Inc. released their first mobile phone, the iPhone.

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Some of the writers born June 29th include:

Joachim Heinrich Campe (1746), Willibald Alexis (1798), Giacomo Leopardi (1798), Devaki Nandan Khatri (1861), Zsigmond Móricz (1879), Fulgence Charpentier (1897), Antoine de Saint-Exupéry (1900), John Toland (1912), Frédéric Dard (1921), Vasko Popa (1922), Chan Parker (1925), Jean-Louis Pesch (1928), Oriana Fallaci (1929), Sławomir Mrożek (1930), John Bradshaw (1933), Chuck Schaden (1934), Don Rosa (1951), Mark Radcliffe (1958), and Samantha Smith (1972).

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We remember two authors today on the anniversary of their passings.

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Irving Wallace was an American best-selling author and screenwriter. Wallace was known for his heavily researched novels, many with a sexual theme. Wallace published 33 books during his lifetime, all translated into 31 languages. Several of Wallace’s books have been made into films. One critic described him “as the most successful of all the many exponents of junk fiction perhaps because he took it all so seriously, not to say lugubriously”. Wallace was a blue-collar writer who wrote for a blue-collar audience. Most critics were scornful of his novels’ flat prose and pedestrian characters. Wallace grew up in Wisconsin. He was the father of Olympic historian David Wallechinsky and author Amy Wallace. Irving Wallace was married to Sylvia Wallace, a former magazine writer and editor. Wallace loved and championed the underdog. He enjoyed writing the stories of outsiders. With his son, daughter and wife he produced some notable non-fiction works, including three editions each of The People’s Almanac and The Book of Lists. Many of the odd facts Wallace uncovered he utilised in his novels.

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Fred Thomas Saberhagen was an American science fiction and fantasy author most famous for his Berserker series of science fiction short stories and S.F. novels. Saberhagen also wrote a series of vampire novels in which the vampires (including the famous Dracula) are the protagonists, and a series of post-apocalyptic mytho-magical novels beginning with his popular Empire of the East and continuing through a long series of Swords and Lost Swords novels. He married fellow writer Joan Spicci in 1968. They had two sons and a daughter. On June 29, 2007, Saberhagen died of prostate cancer in Albuquerque.

The Art of Cross Examination

Today’s special priced book is The Art of Cross Examination by Francis L. Wellman. The copy we have is in Very Good Condition and is from the same same publisher as that pictured but our cover is slightly different, the typical Kessinger yellow-and-white with black lettering. Has never been used, but shows shelf wear.

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Disclaimer:
Much of the information in this blog is taken directly from Wikipedia, Amazon, and other sources such as holidayinsights.com, which are directly linked to within the text. Images have been taken from various sources found via Facebook, Goodsearch.com and Google.
Village Book Shop and the blogger claim no credit for the information above.

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Friday, June 28, 2013

And on the subject of burning books: I want to congratulate librarians, not famous for their physical strength or their powerful political connections or their great wealth, who, all over this country, have staunchly resisted anti-democratic bullies who have tried to remove certain books from their shelves, and have refused to reveal to thought police the names of persons who have checked out those titles.
So the America I loved still exists, if not in the White House or the Supreme Court or the Senate or the House of Representatives or the media. The America I love still exists at the front desks of our public libraries.”
― 
Kurt VonnegutA Man Without a Country

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Today is Paul Bunyan Day! Paul Bunyan day is a US Folktale celebration. It is commemorated on different days in different parts of the U.S. Mostly it is observed in 27-28th of June every year. Paul Bunyan is one of the best-known heroes in American folklore. This legendary lumberjack (and his faithful companion Babe the Blue Ox) starred in many of the “tall tales” told in the Midwest during the 1800s. According to the stories, Bunyan was a giant man with incredible physical strength. He single-handedly established the logging industry, cleared North Dakota of its forests, dug out Lake Superior, and even trained carpenter ants to help his fellow loggers! A young woman named K. Bernice Stewart was the first person to write down the original Bunyan tales. Stewart collected the stories from local loggers while studying at the University of Wisconsin in 1914. Today, Paul Bunyan is mentioned in more than 1,000 books and has become one of the most widespread icons in American culture. French Canadians were believed to have originated Paul Bunyan during the Papineau rebellion of 1837. While he may have been created in Canada, Paul Bunyan quickly became a huge American legend. Many of the tales of Paul Bunyan originated in lumberjack industry and logging communities. Like all good folklore, it was passed from generation to generation by word of mouth. Over campfires, his legend grew, and tales were created. Written tales emerged in the early 1900’s. We could not find why Paul Bunyan Day is celebrated on June 28.

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Today is Insurance Awareness Day. Now, at this point, one must be asking… Why Insurance Awareness Day? Insurance Awareness Day exists to remind you that things go wrong, and that generally, it’s a good idea to have a backup plan. Insurance, be it home, auto or life insurance, offers you peace of mind that if something happens, you will be financially protected. Of course when it comes to life insurance, if something happens, you won’t be around to worry about the outcome. Insurance is a gamble. If you buy it, you’re gambling that something will go wrong. If you don’t buy it, you’re gambling that something will not happen. Insurance is often a necessary evil in the modern world, and regardless of how ethical insurance may (or may not) be as an industry, we’re all very relieved that we took out a policy when something unexpected and untoward occurs!

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On this day in 1776, the Battle of Sullivan’s Island ended with the first decisive American victory in the American Revolutionary War leading to the commemoration of Carolina Day.

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Labor Day became an official US holiday on June 28, 1894.

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Malcolm X formed the Organization of Afro-American Unity on this day in 1964.

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The Stonewall Riots began on June 28, 1969 in New York City marking the start of the Gay Rights Movement.

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On this day in 1997 Mike Tyson was disqualified in the 3rd round of the Holyfield – Tyson II boxing match in the 3rd round for biting a piece off Evander Holyfield’s ear.

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Some of the writers born June 28th include:

Giovanni della Casa (1503), Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712), Emmanuel Rhoides (1836), Luigi Pirandello (1867), Esther Forbes (1891), Eric Ambler (1909), Olle Björklund (1916), A. E. Hotchner (1920), Mel Brooks (1926), Correlli Barnett (1927), Harold Evans (1928), Bette Greene (1934), Richard H. Cracroft (1936), Ron Luciano (1937), David Johnston (1941), Ann Leslie (1941), Howard Barker (1946), Mark Helprin (1947), A. A. Gill (1954), Steven M. Greer (1955), Amira Hass (1956), Georgi Parvanov (1957), Peter Baynham (1963), Tom Merritt (1970), Mike White (1970), Louise Mensch (1971), Harun Tekin (1977), Felicia Day (1979), and Florian Zeller (1979).

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Ten years ago today the world lost Joan Lowery Nixon. She was an American journalist and author, specializing in historical fiction and mysteries for children and young adults. Joan Lowery Nixon was born on February 3, 1927 in Los Angeles. She received a degree in journalism from the University of Southern California in 1947. It was at USC that she met her husband, Hershell, a naval officer and geologist. She sold her books at various schools in Los Angeles before becoming a full-time writer. Nixon, her husband, and their children lived in Corpus Christi before finally settling in the Memorial and Tanglewood area of Houston, Texas. She died of pancreatic cancer in Houston, Texas on June 28, 2003. Nixon wrote more than 140 books. She also co-authored several science books with her geologist husband Hershell Nixon. Nixon was the only author to win four Edgar Allan Poe Awards from the Mystery Writers of America, and had five additional nominations.



Madhur Jaffrey Indian Cooking

Do you love Indian Cooking? Then we have the book for you. Today’s deal is Madhur Jaffrey Indian Cooking. We have one New copy of this 240 page hardcover book by Madhur Jaffrey available. Amazon gives the following description:

Chef magazine called this book’s author “the best-known ambassador of Indian food in the United States” . . . and the Boston Herald referred to her as “the renowned author and actress [who] teaches home cooks about the sophistication and infinite diversity of Indian fare.” The New York Times described her simply and succinctly as “the Indian cuisine authority.” For many years a best-selling cookbook, Madhur Jaffrey’s seminal title on Indian cuisine now has been totally revised, redesigned, enlarged, and enhanced with 70 brand-new full-color photos. With chapters on meat, poultry, fish, and vegetables, as well as pulses, relishes, chutneys, and pickles, the author guides her readers through the delicious and colorful range of Indian food. More than 100 detailed recipes direct home chefs through step-by-step preparation of well-known classics like Tandoori-style Chicken and Naan Bread, as well as more unusual dishes including Salmon Steamed with Mustard Seeds and Tomato and Drunken Orange Slices. Ms. Jaffrey also presents comprehensive background information on spices and seasonings, kitchen equipment, authentic preparation techniques, and suggested menus. Taste-tempting color photos show prepared dishes.

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Disclaimer:
Much of the information in this blog is taken directly from Wikipedia, Amazon, and other sources such as holidayinsights.com, which are directly linked to within the text. Images have been taken from various sources found via Facebook, Goodsearch.com and Google.
Village Book Shop and the blogger claim no credit for the information above.

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Thursday, June 27, 2013

The books that the world calls immoral are books that show the world its own shame.”
― 
Oscar Wilde

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To focus attention on the joy of couples deciding to get married, June 27th is Decide to Be Married Day. Based on the poem “Decide to Be Married”: “It’s in the deciding to be united in love, to express your joyful oneness to every person you meet, and in every action you take and together a perfect marriage you’ll make.” As celebration days go, this one has a pretty clear call to action. One of you needs to propose to the other (getting down on one knee being purely optional). Then, hopefully, your other half will accept that proposal, and you can pop the champagne, excitedly call everyone you know and start making plans for your big day. No one is saying that couples should just decide to get married on a whim. Such a lack of forethought will only lead to an increase in the divorce rate. However, for those who are already in a loving, strong relationship and who have been seriously contemplating marriage, maybe the presence of Decide to Be Married Day is just what’s needed to bring an end to needless procrastination.

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With the modernisation of industry, a move from manufacturing to consumerism and a general shift in global market operations, industrial processes and businesses are much less common than they used to be. As such, it’s easy to overlook just how big a part industry still plays, and how many people are employed by industrial organisations working in industrial roles. Industrial Workers Of The World Day on June 27th draws attention to these workers, and to their importance in producing the goods that we consume and rely on.

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Elton John has over a thousand pairs, Canadian singer Corey Hart only wears his at night, and you can tell the good guys from the bad guys in The Matrix by the shape of theirs. What are we talking about? Sunglasses, of course! There’s nothing quite as stylish as a pair of shades, so get out your aviators or your wayfarers and start celebrating Sunglasses Day! Although the origins of Sunglasses Day are unknown, the history of sunglasses stretches far back. During the prehistoric era, the Inuit people used walrus ivory to create sun goggles, which blocked out the powerful rays of sun that reflected off the snow and ice. In 14th century China judges used eyewear made of smoke-coloured quartz to mask their emotions. Fast-forward 600 years and modern sunglasses as we know them today were first marketed by entrepreneur Sam Foster on the Atlantic City Boardwalk. On the eve of World War II, a little company called Ray Ban began producing anti-glare sunglasses for pilots. “Aviators” became the first commercially successful sunglasses. One other thing to remember is that sunglasses also help protect your eyes from harmful UV light, so channel your inner-cool and slip on those shades on Sunglasses Day! Sunglasses are quite possibly the most important fashion accessory of the entire summer season.

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Helen Keller Day is a commemorative holiday honoring Helen Keller as authorized by President Jimmy Carter in the year 1980, her 100th birthday. The holiday is celebrated on June 27 per the presidential proclamation. According to the Scranton City Paper, the holiday has been used as a fund-raiser by the Lackawanna Branch of the Pennsylvania Association for the Blind in Scranton, Pennsylvania in Helen Keller’s honor. Named for a true innovator in accessibility, Helen Keller Day is a community-event that explores how and why to employ, educate, entertain, and engage everyone through virtual worlds. Helen Keller Day is a day set aside for information acquisition, education, exploration of employment opportunities, social engagement, and enjoyment of arts and entertainment. No one is immune from the feeling that they are excluded or unable to participate fully. Knowing how to include someone with a disability, and make them feel welcome, is an important social skill, and a small but significant kindness that we can all benefit from and feel good about. Learning how to accommodate the needs of individuals with disabilities avails business owners and managers of the services of a large pool of highly qualified, dedicated, and reliable workers that are an asset in many business settings.

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Happy National Handshake Day! Today, we celebrate one of the most common greetings between two people. Did you know that handshakes have been practiced since at least the 2nd century B.C.? Many researchers believe that the handshake originated in the Western world. It was a gesture of peace, demonstrated by the fact that the hands held no weapons. Today, a handshake is offered upon meeting or parting. It is an expression of goodwill, gratitude and congratulations. Many people believe that a handshake reveals something about the character of the person who gives it. A firm handshake reflects a confident personality while a floppy handshake reveals a shy one. Proper handshaking is the gateway to the prospective business deal. Hand shaking is the vehicle of conveying message of trust, friendliness and warmth. Proper handshaking is the means of making person ensured how much confidence you have in you. The problem is that when we shake hands we are potentially exposing ourselves, and the other person, to germs. By extension if we shake hands with someone who has a cold or is spreading bacteria anything we touch shares those germs; door knobs, papers, telephones, our noses and eyes, even our food. Be friendly, shake hands but keep your self as healthy as possible.

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National HIV Testing Day (NHTD) was first observed on June 27, 2005. This day was established as an annual observance to promote HIV testing. This is a particularly important time for YOU to get involved! Take the Test, Take Control. Too many people don’t know they have HIV. In the United States, nearly 1.2 million people are living with HIV, and almost one in five don’t know they are infected. Getting tested is the first step to finding out if you have HIV. If you have HIV, getting medical care and taking medicines regularly helps you live a longer, healthier life and also lowers the chances of passing HIV on to others. Across the country, thousands of HIV testing sites, state and local health departments, and community-based HIV/AIDS service providers will participate in NHTD events, by holding health fairs, providing community and media outreach, hosting special testing-related events or operating extended hours. Some of these events may be scheduled in the days and weeks surrounding NHTD. NHTD organizers will also reach out to communities at increased risk of HIV infection, including African American and Latino populations, both of which are disproportionately affected with HIV when compared to other demographic groups in the United States. The campaign also highlights the HIVtest.org website, which allows users to locate HIV testing sites in their area. The CDC recommends everyone between the ages of 13 and 64 years of age be HIV-tested at least once as part of their regular health screening. Pregnant women should also undergo testing as part of their routine prenatal check-up at each pregnancy to help prevent passing HIV to their babies. The CDC also suggests yearly testing for those at higher risk for HIV, such as intravenous drugs users, people who exchange sex for money or drugs, gay and bisexual men, or people with multiple sex partners. Consult with a healthcare provider to find an HIV testing center, or find a place to be tested in the community. You can find the location of local HIV testing sites by entering your zip code at this website, http://hivtest.org/, or you can text your zip code to “KNOW IT” (566948), or call 1-800-CDC-INFO (232-4636) or 1-888-232-6348 (TTY) 24 hours per day. All of these resources are free and confidential. AIDS is a global epidemic. The CDC first recognized AIDS in 1981, but diagnostic testing and treatment has improved drastically over the last 30 years. The extent and quality of life in patients with HIV/AIDS can be drastically improved. However, high-risk behavior is still prevalent in some communities and continued testing, diagnosis and treatment remains a national health objective.

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The first solo circumnavigation of the globe was completed by Joshua Slocum from Briar Island, Nova Scotia on June 27, 1898.

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The United States decided on this day in 1950 to send troops to fight in the Korean War.

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On June 27, 1985, the U.S. Route 66 was officially removed from the United States Highway System after it had been replaced in its etirety by the Interstate Highway System.

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Some of the writers born June 27th include:

Manikkavacakar (862), Louise von François (1817), Lafcadio Hearn (1850), Kate Carew (1869), Emma Goldman (1869), Paul Laurence Dunbar (1872), Helen Keller (1880), Gaston Bachelard (1884), Lewis Bernstein Namier (1888), Vernon Watkins (1906), Catherine Cookson (1906), João Guimarães Rosa (1908), Robert Aickman (1914), Grace Lee Boggs (1915), James Lincoln Collier (1928), Peter Maas (1929), Lucille Clifton (1936), Kirkpatrick Sale (1937), Tommy Cannon (1938), Ivan Doig (1939), James P. Hogan (1941), Anita Diamant (1951), Alice McDermott (1953), Scott Cunningham (1956), Dan Jurgens (1959), Igor Kusin (1963), J. J. Abrams (1966), Jo Frost (1971), Dawud Wharnsby (1972), and Tanay Chheda (1996).

miracle worker

In honor of Helen Keller Day we are temporarily lowering our already low price on The Miracle Worker: A Play by William Gibson. This is the unforgettable, inspiring story of Helen Keller and Anne Sullivan, the woman who set her free.

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Disclaimer:
Much of the information in this blog is taken directly from Wikipedia, Amazon, and other sources such as holidayinsights.com, which are directly linked to within the text. Images have been taken from various sources found via Facebook, Goodsearch.com and Google.
Village Book Shop and the blogger claim no credit for the information above.

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Wednesday, June 26, 2013

Those who find ugly meanings in beautiful things are corrupt without being charming. This is a fault. Those who find beautiful meanings in beautiful things are the cultivated. For these there is hope. They are the elect to whom beautiful things mean only Beauty. There is no such thing as a moral or an immoral book. Books are well written, or badly written. That is all.”
― Oscar Wilde
The Picture of Dorian Gray


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It’s National Chocolate Pudding Day! Did you know that dessert puddings can be traced all the way back to the 17th century? During that time, a “pudding” was actually a very moist cake (similar to a modern-day bread pudding or plum pudding). National Chocolate Pudding Day is a fun day to celebrate for young and old alike. You can make chocolate pudding from a mix or from scratch. Serve your pudding with colored sprinkles or animal shaped cookies for dipping. However you choose to serve your chocolate pudding, do it with flair today. You’ll get a different type of chocolate pudding depending on where you ask for it. In the UK and some Commonwealth countries, chocolate pudding is steamed and thickened with eggs. This gives it more of a cake-like texture. In the US, Canada and parts of Asia, the custard is thickened with a starch and then boiled, resulting in a more creamy texture. Although the Jell-O brand started making some fruity flavors of pudding back in 1897, chocolate wasn’t introduced until 1936. At first it was called Walter Baker’s Dessert, but in 1936, the name was changed to Jell-O Chocolate Pudding.

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Today is Beautician’s Day, your chance to show your appreciation to those who make you look beautiful and stunning. Anybody who has anything to do with your appearance should be recognized on this day, your hairstylist, barber, and manicurist. Their talents and training transforms the everyday you into the beautiful person you always knew was inside of you. They make you glow, and feel great about yourself. The guys appreciate the Beautician, too. It’s fair and fitting that you show your appreciation to your Beautician today. But, we also found some reference to suggest that Beauticians consider this a day for them to show their appreciation to their patrons. Now, that’s a novel and admirable concept.

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The International Day against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking is a United Nations International Day against drug abuse and the illegal drug trade. It’s been held annually since 1988 on June 26, a date chosen to commemorate Lin Zexu’s dismantling of the opium trade in Humen, Guangdong, just before the First Opium War in China. The purpose of the day is to raise awareness of the major problem that illicit drugs represent to society. This day is supported by individuals, communities and various organizations all over the world. The UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) has, over the years, been actively involved in launching campaigns to mobilize support for drug control. The UNODC often teams up with other organizations and encourages people in society to actively take part in these campaigns.

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The United Nations’ (UN) International Day in Support of Victims of Torture is annually observed on June 26 to remind people that human torture is not only unacceptable – it is also a crime. This event gives everyone a chance to unite and voice their opinions against human torture. Organizations, including the International Rehabilitation Council for Torture Victims and Amnesty International, have played an active role in organizing events around the world to promote the day. Activities may include: photo exhibitions; the distribution of posters and other material to boost people’s awareness of issues related to human torture; and television advertisements. On June 26, 1987, the Convention against Torture came into force. It was an important step in the process of globalizing human rights and acknowledging that torture and inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment should be universally illegal. In 1997 the United Nations General Assembly decided to mark this historic date and designated June 26 each year as the International Day in Support of Victims of Torture. The first International Day in Support of Victims of Torture was held on June 26, 1998. That same year marked the 50th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which proclaims that “no one shall be subjected to torture or to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment”. Nearly 100 organisation in dozens of countries all over the world mark the day each year with events, celebrations and campaigns.

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The Christian holiday of Christmas was declared a federal holiday in the United States on this day in 1870.

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The United Nations Charter was signed in San Francisco on June 26, 1945.

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Shirley Jackson’s short story The Lottery was published in The New Yorker magazine on this day in 1948.

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On June 26, 1997, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the Communications Decency Act violated the First Amendment to the United States Constitution.

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The U.S. Surpreme Court ruled ten years ago today in Lawrence v. Texas that gender-based sodomy laws are unconstitutional.

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Some of the writers born June 26th include:

Cho Shik (1501), Wolfgang Menzel (1798), Branwell Brontë (1817), Thomas W. Knox (1835), Bankim Chandra Chattopadhyay (1838), Sam Watkins (1839), Bernard Berenson (1865), Martin Andersen Nexø (1869), Ya’akov Cohen (1881), Pearl S. Buck (1892), Aimé Césaire (1913), Laurie Lee (1914), Charlotte Zolotow (1915), Virginia Satir (1916), Richard Neustadt (1919), Walter Farley (1922), Robert Kroetsch (1927), Colin Wilson (1931), Jeremy Wolfenden (1934), Dwight York (1935), Edith Pearlman (1936), Nancy Willard (1936), Yves Beauchemin (1941), Warren Farrell (1943), Preston A. Whitmore II (1962), Dany Boon (1966), Paul Thomas Anderson (1970), and Aubrey Plaza (1984).


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It was one year ago today that the world lost the American journalist, essayist, playwright, screenwriter, novelist, producer, director, and blogger, Nora Ephron. Ephron is best known for her romantic comedies and was nominated three times for the Academy Award for Best Writing (Original Screenplay): for Silkwood, When Harry Met Sally…, and Sleepless in Seattle. She won a BAFTA Award for Best Original Screenplay for When Harry Met Sally….She sometimes wrote with her sister Delia Ephron. Her last film was Julie & Julia. She also co-authored the Drama Desk Award-winning theatrical production Love, Loss, and What I Wore. Her sisters Delia and Amy are also screenwriters. Her sister Hallie Ephron is a journalist, book reviewer, and novelist who writes crime fiction. She was married three times. Her first marriage, to writer Dan Greenburg, ended in divorce after nine years. In 1976, she married journalist Carl Bernstein of Watergate fame. Ephron was married for more than 20 years to screenwriter Nicholas Pileggi until her death. Although Jewish by birth, Ephron was not religious. Her son Jacob Bernstein is to direct an HBO movie on her life called Everything Is Copy. For many years, Ephron was among only a handful of people in the world who knew the true identity of Deep Throat, the source for news articles written by her ex-husband Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward during the Watergate scandal. Ephron said she guessed the identity of Deep Throat after reading Bernstein’s notes, which referred to the unnamed person as “MF.” Bernstein claimed “MF” was short for “My Friend”, but Ephron guessed correctly that the initials stood for Mark Felt, the late former Associate Director of the FBI, whom some suspected to be Bernstein and Woodward’s source. Ephron’s marriage with Bernstein ended acrimoniously, and after the breakup Ephron was open about the identity of Deep Throat. On June 26, 2012 Ephron died from pneumonia, a complication resulting from acute myeloid leukemia, a condition with which she was diagnosed in 2006. In her final book, I Remember Nothing (2010), Ephron left clues that something was wrong with her or that she was ill, particularly in a list at the end of the book citing “things I won’t miss/things I’ll miss.” There was widespread and somewhat shocked reaction to her death (as she had kept her illness secret from most people), with celebrities such as Meryl Streep, Matthew Broderick, Billy Crystal, Meg Ryan, Nicole Kidman, Tom Hanks, Albert Brooks, and Ron Howard commenting on her brilliance, warmth, generosity, and wit.

 

The World of Faery

 

Today we have a special price for you on the book The World of Faery: An Inspirational Collection of Art for Faery Lovers that was compiled by David Riche and has a forward by Alan Lee. This hardcover book is a new book but has shelf wear to the dust jacket from being handled in store. Amazon gives the following description:

Following the huge success of The Art of Faery (2003), the collaborators have once again come together to create another astonishing collection. These are the most imaginative and beautiful images produced by the best fairy artists working today, all superbly reproduced for fans and connoisseurs. New contributors have joined some of those showcased in the last anthology, and their pieces use every form of media in a rich and magical mix: watercolor, pen and ink, oil, and pastel. Among those represented: Amy Brown, Linda Ravenscroft, Myrea Pettit, and Stephanie Pui-Mun Law. From Josephine Wall’s gentle Caught by a Sunbeam, with its sweetly sleeping fairy, to Marc Potts’ slightly sinister The Changeling, each one depicts a world of fantasy.

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Disclaimer:
Much of the information in this blog is taken directly from Wikipedia, Amazon, and other sources such as holidayinsights.com, which are directly linked to within the text. Images have been taken from various sources found via Facebook, Goodsearch.com and Google.
Village Book Shop and the blogger claim no credit for the information above.

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Tuesday, June 25, 2013

Books are the quietest and most constant of friends; they are the most accessible and wisest of counselors, and the most patient of teachers.”
― Charles William Eliot

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There are plenty of reasons to celebrate the Beatles and their music. Not there’s Global Beatles Day on June 25. This date was chosen because the first global transmission ever included the Beatles singing ‘All You Need is Love’ occurred. Faith Cohen, the person who conceived GBD, said “I was aware that there was a Beatles Day held in Liverpool on July 10th. The Liverpool organizers of Beatles Day chose July 10th because this was the day the Beatles returned to Liverpool from America and the premiere of ‘A Hard Day’s Night.'” She launched her idea in February of 2009, with the idea for a holiday that “would not pigeonhole the Beatles’ contributions or their impact on the world. It is not limited to their amazing and transcendent music.” Cohen says she’s asking participants to bring the Beatles into some aspect of their life on that day.

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Happy Leon Day. In the United States, Leon Day is the halfway mark to Christmas (“Leon” is “Noel” spelled backwards) and is celebrated on June 25th, i.e. the turning point when Christmas begins to come closer on the calendar. For many crafters, Leon Day is a time to begin thinking about creating gifts and decorations for the Christmas holiday. You only have 182.5 more days to shop for Christmas gifts. The holiday is not so odd when you consider some people also celebrate their half birthdays. It’s a great thing to do when you don’t like your birthday month.

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Log Cabin Day, celebrated either June 25th or the last sunday of June by various groups, brings you back to a quieter, simpler, more rugged era. A couple hundred years ago, life was far more rugged. Americans moving West (west at the time may have been Ohio, or Tennessee) found an untouched wilderness, filled with pristine forests. They built their homes out of logs. These log cabins were solid, long lasting, and served them well. Life was rustic and simple. Heat was provided by an open fireplace, where they also cooked their meals. Need air conditioning in the summer? Just open the window (there wasn’t any glass or screening). There was no electricity (no television, stereos or boom boxes blasting, or computers). And, plumbing? Just look back towards the woods to the outhouse. The path to it is well worn. Today celebrates what was then the “Modern” home in America, and all of the lifestyle that accompanied it. It’s a day to appreciate the history and significance of log cabins. The Log Cabin Society, founded by Virginia Handy, and the Bad Axe Historical Society, in Michigan created the annual Log Cabin Day on June 25, 1986. Their objectives included promoting the preservation of Log Cabins, and awareness and education of life during the era in America when log cabins were common. Log cabins were first constructed in the U.S. in 1638. Swedish settlers in New Sweden used log structures in New Sweden (what is now Wilmington, Delaware). German and Ukrainian immigrants then used this technique as well. The Scots and Scots-Irish had no tradition of building with logs, but they quickly adopted the method. English settlers didn’t widely use log cabins. Few log cabins dating from the 18th century still stand, but they were not intended as permanent dwellings. When a larger, more formal house was constructed, log cabins were often converted into outbuildings for chicken coops, animal shelters, or other utilitarian purposes. Log cabins played an important role in the development of this entire country and honoring that memory presents a way to keep that pioneer spirit alive in ourselves – and teach it to our children.

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It’s National Catfish Day. It’s a day to enjoy some tasty catfish. You should have no doubt what to do today. On June 25, 1987, President Ronald Reagan began a presidential proclamation with the words “More and more Americans are discovering a uniquely American food delicacy — farm-raised catfish.” Catfish is a versatile and delicious type of fish that is usually associated with Cajun-style cooking. In fact, about 95% of the nation’s catfish comes from Mississippi, Arkansas, Alabama, and Louisiana. In traditional recipes, each catfish fillet is coated with a blend of spices and then fried or blackened in a cast-iron skillet. Catfish is one of the most sustainable species of fish. Most of the catfish we eat is farm-raised, which is very eco-friendly.

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On June 25, 1788 Virginia became the 10th state to ratify the United States Constitution.

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The United States Congress passed the Mann Act on this day in 1910, which prohibited interstate transport of females for “immoral purposes”; the ambiguous language would be used to selectively prosecute people for years to come.

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The Diary of a Young Girl (better known as The Diary of Anne Frank) was published on June 25, 1947.

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The rainbow flag representing gay pride was flown for the first time in the San Francisco Gay Freedom Day Parade thirty five years ago today.

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On this day in 1981, Microsoft was restructured to become an incorporated business in its home state of Washington.

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One year ago today the final beam of 4 World Trade Center was lifted into place in a ceremony.

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Some of the writers born June 25th include:

Georges Courteline (1858), Géza Gyóni (1884), George Abbott (1887), Frigyes Karinthy (1887), George Orwell (1903), P. H. Newby (1918), Dorothy Gilman (1923), Nicholas Mosley (1923), Ingeborg Bachmann (1926), Peyo (1928), Eric Carle (1929), James Meredith (1933), Jack W. Hayford (1934), Charles Sheffield (1935), Bert Hölldobler (1936), A.J. Quinnell (1940), Michel Trenblay (1942), Robert Charlebois (1944), Carly Simon (1945), Marcello Toninelli (1950), Daryush Shokof (1954), Anthony Bourdain (1956), Ricky Gervais (1961), Yann Martel (1963), and Ariel Gore (1970).

welcome to michaels


We have a book for anyone who has ever wanted to entertain at home. We are reducing the price of Welcome to Michael’s: Great Food, Great People, Great Party! starting today for one week only. This hardcover book by celebrity chef Michael McCarty has a forward by Liz Smith. We have one New copy available. Amazon gives the following description:

Michael McCarty has played a major role in defining a uniquely modern American attitude to cooking, dining, and entertaining since 1979, when he opened his first acclaimed Michael”s restaurant in Santa Monica, California. McCarty”s approach, now enjoyed on both coasts with the opening of Michael’s New York in 1989, has always been refreshingly simple: start with the best ingredients, cook them in simple ways that highlight their natural qualities, pair them with great wines, and serve them in a relaxed yet stylish setting. The result, in Michael’s own words, should be a “great party,” which this book makes possible for any home cook. Adding to the lively spirit of Welcome to Michael’s are the voices of dozens of luminaries from the worlds of entertainment, the arts, the media, business, politics, and cooking who share their own insightful, sometimes irreverent opinions about the Michael’s experience. The result is a book to be savored on many levels: as a guide to cooking for yourself, your family, and your friends and to entertaining with style; as a primer on the rewarding relationship between food and wine; and as an experience that comes as close as words and pictures possibly can to enjoying a meal at one of Michael’s restaurants, surrounded by the luminous personalities who dine there.

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Disclaimer:
Much of the information in this blog is taken directly from Wikipedia, Amazon, and other sources such as holidayinsights.com, which are directly linked to within the text. Images have been taken from various sources found via Facebook, Goodsearch.com and Google.
Village Book Shop and the blogger claim no credit for the information above.

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Monday, June 24, 2013

Books are the perfect entertainment: no commercials, no batteries, hours of enjoyment for each dollar spent. What I wonder is why everybody doesn’t carry a book around for those inevitable dead spots in life.” 
― Stephen King

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June 24 is the 175th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 190 days remaining until the end of the year. In Iceland, folklore says that if you bathe naked in the morning dew on the morning of June 24, you are supposed to keep aging at bay for longer.

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World UFO Day is an awareness day for people to gather together and watch the skies for unidentified flying objects. The day is celebrated by some on June 24, and others on July 2. June 24 is the date that aviator Kenneth Arnold reported what is generally considered to be unidentified flying object sighting in the United States, while July 2 commemorates the supposed UFO crash in the 1947 Roswell UFO Incident.

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If you believe in the mystical and magical world of mythological creatures, and who doesn’t, you’re in luck. June 24th is also International Fairy Day. While the origins of thisholiday” are unknown, this special day celebrates those very special, diminutive beings with wispy wings and magical powers that leave a trail of fairy dust in their wake. Fairy Day is a day for fairies, magic, and wishes to come true. For one day, put aside the cycnicism of the modern world and embrace the possibilities of the unknown, and believe in fairies. Many famous fairies have flown into the hearts of both young and old alike: The Tooth fairy, Tinker Bell, The Fairy Godmother, The Sugar Plum Fairy, Thumbelina, and Puck just to name a few. There are many different kinds of fairies, they live everywhere you can think of. There are Woodland fairies, Butterfly fairies, Earth fairies, Cloud fairies, Tree fairies, Water fae, and more. Fairies are often called by other names including: Faery, Fae, Faerie, Fay, Sidhe, Wee Folk, Good Folk, and Sprite. For centuries, fairies have been an important part of Celtic culture. In all of the ancient legends, these mythological creatures are described as intelligent, mischievous, and magical. They have the ability to fly and cast spells, and they live in “Tír na nÓg,” the land of eternal youth. Mortals don’t often see fairies because of the division between the two worlds, but sightings can occur at twilight or during Beltane, Mid-Summer’s Eve, or All Hallow’s Eve. In his 1904 play Peter Pan, J.M. Barrie wrote that when the first baby laughed, the laugh broke into a thousand pieces, and that was the beginning of fairies. International Fairy Day is the perfect opportunity to relive your childhood fantasies and celebrate the joy and magic of the fairy world. Read a classic fairy tale, build a fairy house, or take a stroll through the woods. You never know when you might stumble across something magical.

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Today is Swim a Lap Day, a day to put on your bathing suit (or go bare if you dare), and get a little exercise in the pool. Swim a Lap Day is good for your health. And, it’s a fun day, too! Summer has arrived. It’s time to enjoy all that summer has to offer, including plenty of time in and around the pool. What better way to enjoy the early days of summer, than by taking a lap or two (or three) around the pool. Wether you’re a member at the YMCA, frequent the community pool, or have your own posh setup in your backyard, get out there and enjoy a swim while the weather’s nice and hot.

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Today is Celebration of the Senses Day, a holiday that not many are familiar with but all can enjoy especially when it comes to health and beauty. People have been stimulating the five senses since the Greeks and Romans but in today’s fast paced technical world many have ignored optimizing each sense. The five human senses are hearing, taste, touch, smell, and sight. Treat yourself to a stimulation of the 5 senses and you will experience the elevation known as the elusive sixth sense.

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The first television western, Hopalong Cassidy, staring William Boyd aired on NBC for the first time on this day in 1949.

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In Roth v. United States, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on June 24, 1957 that obscenity is not protected by the First Amendment.

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In New York, capital punishment was declared unconstitutional on this day in 2004.

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Some of the writers born June 24th include:

John of the Cross (1542), Jean-Baptiste de Boyer, Marquis d’Argens (1704), Jean-Baptiste Benoît Eyriès (1767), Ambrose Bierce (1842), George Shiels (1886), Arseny Tarkovsky (1907), Ernesto Sabato (1911), Mary Wesley (1912), Jean-Pierre Ferland (1934), Lawrence Block (1938), Julia Kristeva (1941), Kathryn Lasky (1944), Clarissa Dickson Wright (1947), Mercedes Lackey (1950), Kathy Troccoli (1958), Scott Oden (1967), Louisa Leaman (1976), and Petra Němcová (1979).

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Also born today was Roy O. Disney. Everyone recognizes the name Disney but few know much about Roy O. (or Roy E. for that matter). Roy Oliver Disney was born June 24, 1893. Roy O. is one of Walt Disney’s older brothers and his business partner. Roy spent 1917-1919 in the US Navy but was discharged from military duty after suffering an injury and became a banker in Los Angeles. In 1923, Walt moved to Hollywood, joining Roy, together founding the Disney Bros Studio. Roy and Walt ordered and built kit houses from Pacific Ready Cut Homes (a Los Angeles company) and in 1928, they built their homes side by side on Lyric Avenue. While Walt was the creative man, Roy was the one who made sure the company was financially stable; Roy and Walt both founded Disney Studios as brothers, but Walt would buy out most of Roy’s share in 1929. Roy became the company’s first CEO in 1929, although the official title was not given until 1968. He also shared the role of Chairman of the Board with Walt from 1945. After Walt Disney’s death in 1966, Roy postponed his retirement to oversee construction of what was then known as Disney World, and later renamed it Walt Disney World as a tribute to his brother. Roy became the president of Walt Disney Productions on December 15, 1966 (the day Walt died), and remained so until 1968. Roy was married to Edna Francis from April 1925 until his death; their only child Roy Edward Disney, was born on January 10, 1930. Throughout his life, Roy rejected the publicity and fame that came with being Walt’s brother. He was extremely camera shy, and a passive individual resulting in few public photos being in existence. After Walt Disney World opened in October 1971, Roy Disney finally retired. In early December of that year, he complained of a “spot” over one of his eyes and was scheduled to visit his optometrist for a new eyeglass prescription. He was discovered in a dazed condition, collapsed, next to his bed by family members; he died from a seizure on December 20, 1971. His interment was located in Forest Lawn – Hollywood Hills Cemetery. A statue of Roy O. Disney seated on a park bench beside Minnie Mouse is located in the Town Square section of Main Street, U.S.A., at the Magic Kingdom theme park in Florida. A duplicate is located outside the Team Disney building at Disney’s corporate headquarters in Burbank, California. There is a third statue at the Tokyo Disneyland theme park. Roy O. Disney was the father of Roy E. Disney, who also made significant contributions to the Disney company until his own death in 2009. There is a Roy O. Disney Suite on the top floor of the Hong Kong Disneyland Hotel. The suite is one of the two largest suites of the hotel. Other tributes to Roy O. Disney exist such as his and Walt’s initials in the iron work above the Pirates of the Caribean ride in Disneyland in California.

america's pioneer aces

Today we bring you America’s Pioneer Aces by James H. Farmer at the lowest price currently available, lowered even more for this week only. This hardcover book is just over 300 pages long and brand new.

reader not because i dont have a life

Disclaimer:
Much of the information in this blog is taken directly from Wikipedia, Amazon, and other sources such as holidayinsights.com, which are directly linked to within the text. Images have been taken from various sources found via Facebook, Goodsearch.com and Google.
Village Book Shop and the blogger claim no credit for the information above.

 

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Sunday, June 23, 2013

I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of any thing than of a book! — When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if I have not an excellent library.”
― 
Jane AustenPride and Prejudice

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It is Lightning Safety Awareness Week. “When Thunder Roars, Go Indoors!” The NOAA’s National Weather Service hosts this annual lightning safety campaign in order to educate people about the danger of lightening and to reduce the number of deaths cause by lightening each year. The national weather service offers tool kits, online information, expert help and more. While lightning can be fascinating to watch, it is extremely dangerous. People are encouraged to follow the motto,”When Thunder Roars, Go Indoors . . .and stay there at least 30 minutes after the last clap of thunder.” Whenever you hear thunder, you are at risk of lightning strikes. For a very informative and entertaining explaination of how lightening works there is a 40 minute podcast from Stuff You Should Know (one of the audio programs available through itunes and elsewhere online for free by Discovery Communications, The World’s #1 Nonfiction Media Company). The podcast is professional quality and there is now a mock-reality style show on the Science Channel about (and starring) these podcasters. You can listen to Chuck and Josh explain lighting in the How Lighting Works episode by clicking here.

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Carpenter Ant Awareness Week (annually the last full week of June) is not in celebration of an inch-long pest. This isn’t about issues related to the carpenter ant community. This week focuses attention on the identification, biology and habits of carpenter ants and provides consumers with information on the elimination of these costly pests. Every year, carpenter ants cause millions of dollars of damage to U.S. homes by eating away at home foundations. Carpenter ants are very common and are frequently seen in the open. It is important to learn how to identify them. There are several species of carpenter ants that may be found infesting homes and other buildings. There are “workers” which are red or black in color and range in size from 1/4 to 3/8 inch, while “winged queen” ants may be as large as one inch. Carpenter ants differ from termites for a few reasons: first, they do not eat the wood, they simply create tunnels and galleries, removing the wood; they also have narrow waists, dark-colored bodies, elbowed antennae, and if present, front wings longer than hind wings. Carpenter ants feed on sources of sugar and protein. Outdoors, carpenter ants feed on dead and living insects. Indoors, they feed on meats and sweets. They tend to search for food in the early evening during spring and summer months. Nests have been found behind bathroom tiles, around tubs, showers, sinks, and dishwashers; under roofing, subfloor insulation, in attic beams, and in hollow spaces such as doors, wall voids, and curtain rods. Carpenter ants may also nest in foam insulation. The longer a colony is present in a structure, the greater the damage that can be done. Carpenter ant damage can be severe if structural wood is weakened.

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Each year the last week of June is declared National Mosquito Control Awareness Week by the American Mosquito Control Association. AMCA’s “Mosquito Week” educates the general public about the significance of mosquitoes in their daily lives and the important service provided by mosquito control workers throughout the United States and worldwide. Mosquito bites are not only a nuisance, but they can be deadly. With the prominence of West Nile Virus and the persistence of malaria in certain parts of the world, it’s certainly important to raise awareness about how to protect yourself from these flying pests. Enjoy the outdoors this summer and stop the spread of mosquito-borne illness by following tips offered by the AMCA to prevent mosquito infestation and control an existing problem. Easy steps to take in any backyard include cleaning debris from rain gutters, filling drain puddles and ditches, changing bird bath water once a week and checking for trapped water in canvas or plastic tarps. If a mosquito problem already exists, AMCA recommends controlling adult mosquitoes through mosquito traps, space sprays and vegetation management. Mosquitoes can also be kept out of the home by keeping windows, doors and porches tightly screened. AMCA reminds the public to practice the THREE D’s of mosquito prevention — Drain, Dress and Defend. Drain: empty out water containers at least once a week. Dress: Wear long sleeves, long pants, and loose-fitting clothing. Defend: Properly apply an approved repellent.

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The United Nations’ Public Service Day is held on June 23 each year. It recognizes that democracy and successful governance are built on the foundation of a competent civil service. The day aims to celebrate the value and virtue of service to the community. The United Nations (UN) holds a Public Service Awards ceremony each year. It rewards the creative achievements and contributions of public service institutions worldwide. This event promotes the role, professionalism and visibility of public service. Many public service organizations and departments around the world celebrate this day by holding various events to recognize the valuable role that public servants play in making improvements in society. Activities include: information days featuring stalls and booths about the public service; organized lunches with guest speakers; internal awards ceremonies within public service agencies or departments; and special announcements to honor public servants. The United Nations Public Service Award is the most prestigious international recognition of excellence in public service. It rewards the creative achievements and contributions of public service institutions that lead to a more effective and responsive public administration in countries worldwide.

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It’s National Pink Day, a day where everything should be basking in pink splendor! It’s especially a day for the ladies, as pink is often a girl’s favorite color. Guys, you can participate in National Pink Day, too. Note: the girls will love you for it! It’s easy to enjoy and to participate in National Pink Day. Bring your pink elephant out of hiding. Wear pink, and show off everything you have that’s pink, from clothing and shoes to other possessions. Be creative. Use food coloring to make pink meals. Pink frosting on a cake or cookies will be a big hit today.

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Speaking of Pink, today is Pink Flamingo Day. Yes, there really is a day to celebrate pink flamingos everywhere. Plastic pink flamingos that is, on lawns (and probably in many attics or basements now) all over the world. Pink Flamingo Day was declared in 2007 by the mayor of Leominster, Massachusetts, to honor the work of Don Featherstone, creator of the iconic plastic lawn flamingo. The original pink plastic flamingo was manufactured in the U.S. by Union Products until production ceased in 2006. But Pink Flamingo Day lives on, along with the ever-popular pink birds of pop culture fame, which still proudly adorn yards and gardens from coast to coast.

 

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Today is National Let It Go Day. Whatever it is that’s been grabbing your gut or your psyche, let it go. Just let it go. It’ll be a better day afterwards. When considering the ‘letting go’ of the past, or things that are not helpful to us, we must remember the person, place, or thing was just that… in the past. All that remains is the past definitions we’ve agreed to hold on to. The real power is the TITLE, NAME, CONCEPT, IDEA, THOUGHT, and MEMORY we allow. It is now just a NOUN, or a SYMBOL. We may remember them, but we can also work towards releasing the power we give to it. Life is way too short to continue to hold a grudge or a bad feeling about someone for longer than twenty minutes.

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June 23 is National Pecan Sandie Day. What are pecan sandies though? Small sweet cookies laced with chopped pecans. Cookies, in general, are small sweet “cakes”. The ancestors to our cookies were first coarse grain cakes baked on hot stones by primitive farmers about 10,000 years ago. Roman soldiers’ diets were supplemented with hard tack, and it has been included in many ships’ rations sailing from European ports throughout history. As time went on, a sweet version was made for special events. In most parts of the world, what we call a “cookie” is referred to even yet as a biscuit. Our own “cookie” descends from a Dutch word used for the small sweet cakes that they baked, as we abandoned British terms in our post-revolutionary era. Pecan sandies are a type of cookie made from flour, brown sugar, butter, pecans, and sometimes additional ingredients. Recipes for pecan sandies are generally egg-free. The texture of pecan sandies is similar to shortbread, although perhaps a little softer. The origin of pecan sandies is thought to be the sweet treats found in medieval Arab cuisine. It is thought that many similar sweet cookies in European and Western cuisine may have evolved from sugar-rich baked goods from the Middle East. The inclusion of nuts or seeds is usually associated with things such as fertility, abundance and prosperity. These cookies are simple to make and taste delicious. Not too sweet. Some people like to chop the pecans coursely, and that works, but you can also pulverize them. National Pecan Sandies Day is not an official holiday with a recorded pronouncement by an organization or by government. However, it does appear on food holiday lists and unofficial holiday lists. One of the most obvious ways to celebrate this food holiday is to bake pecan sandies with family or friends, using one of the many simple recipes that are readily available. Recipes for pecan sandies are known to be one of the simplest and easiest baking recipes in existence, and they are very suitable for baking with children.

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The Government Printing Office was established on this day in 1860 by the United States Congress.

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Christopher Latham Sholes received a patent on June 23, 1868 for an invention he called the “Type-Writer”.

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The International Olympic Committee was founded June 23, 1894, at the Sorbonne in Paris, at the initiative of Baron Pierre de Coubertin.

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On this day in 1938 the Civil Aeronautics Act was signed into law, forming the Civil Aeronautics Authority in the United States.

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The United States Food and Drug Administration declared on June 23, 1972, Enovid to be the first officially approved combined oral contraceptive pill in the world.

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On June 23, 1972, U.S. President Richard M. Nixon and White House Chief of Staff H.R. Haldeman were taped talking about using the Central Intelligence Agency to obstruct the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s investigation into the Watergate break-ins.

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On this day in 1972, Title IX of the United States Civil Rights Act of 1964 was amended to prohibit sexual discrimination to any educational program receiving federal funds.



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Some of the writers born June 23rd include:

Giambattista Vico (1668), Sándor Bródy (1863), Anna Akhmatova (1889), Jean Anouilh (1910), Gordon B. Hinckley (1910), Bill King (1910), Michael Shaara (1928), Richard Bach (1936), Adam Faith (1940), Roger McDonald (1941), Vint Cerf (1943), Kjell Albin Abrahamson (1945), Darhyl S. Ramsey (1948), Glenn Danzig (1955), Maggie Greenwald (1955), Joss Whedon (1964), Natalia Germanou (1965), and Becky Cloonan (1980).

baking ilustrated

Today’s special priced book is for all you bakers out there. Baking Illustrated by Cook’s Illustrated Magazine Editors is a 515 page hardcover practical kitchen companion with more than 350 recipes. The recipes include some for breads, pizza, cookies, cakes, pies and tarts. There are classics and contemporary favorites. The book is densely packed with rich photo finished information all devoted to baking. This book is set up in an easy-to-use format.


nothing on how to kill a mockingbird

Disclaimer:
Much of the information in this blog is taken directly from Wikipedia, Amazon, and other sources such as holidayinsights.com, which are directly linked to within the text. Images have been taken from various sources found via Facebook, Goodsearch.com and Google.
Village Book Shop and the blogger claim no credit for the information above.

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Saturday, June 22, 2013

What really knocks me out is a book that, when you’re all done reading it, you wish the author that wrote it was a terrific friend of yours and you could call him up on the phone whenever you felt like it. That doesn’t happen much, though.”
― 
J.D. SalingerThe Catcher in the Rye

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Being the fourth Saturday of June, today is the Great American Campout. Thousands of people across the nation will gather in their backyards, neighborhoods, communities and parks to take part in a one-night FREE event that will provide an experience for all generations to connect with nature. The positive effects of daily, unstructured time outdoors on kids’ health are well-documented and wide-ranging. Families and friends are encouraged to Be Out There™ in order to give back to American children what they don’t even know they’ve lost—their connection to the natural world. Sponsored by the National Wildlife Federation, an environmental organization founded in 1935, this event aims to reconnect kids with nature so as to instill a lifetime appreciation for the outdoors. “Why camp?”, you may ask. Plainly stated, camping is fun! As kids, we have fond memories of sleepovers at our friends’ houses. But some of us also remember great nights spent under the stars, roasting marshmallows and telling stories around a campfire – cherished memories that will last a lifetime. Camping is an American tradition dating as far back as 1861, at the beginning of the Civil War, when Gunnery Camp was first established in Connecticut. Like the modern-day Great American Campout, it sought to encourage hiking, spending time outdoors and exploration of the natural world. And since then, camping has become a familiar part of the American landscape. The camping experience can also nurture and strengthen bonds between families or friends. The purpose of the Great American Backyard Campout, is simply encourage folks to turn off the TV, shut down the computer and put aside the cell phone. Instead, set up that tent and pull out those sleeping bags along with fellow family members or friends. Gain hands-on experience by challenging yourself to learn some outdoor skills, such as basic first aid or how to start a campfire, which will prove useful for future trips. You will feel a sense of accomplishment and build confidence each time you learn a new task. It is especially important for kids now because, for the first time in our country’s history, we have an entire generation that is growing up disconnected from nature. Spending time outdoors, like Campout, makes kids happier and healthier. The National Wildlife Federation provides everything you need to head out into the great outdoors. The Campout website has packing lists, recipes, nocturnal wildlifeguides, exploration activities, nature games, fundraising prizes, directory of Campouts by state to search for large groups to join, and more. Collecting donations for the Great American Backyard Campout is encouraged but not required; donations support programs to make outdoor time a priority for today’s youth.

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Today is the Polar Bear Swim, an annual tradition. In Alaska, since 1975, on the red sand beaches, more than 100 intrepid swimmers have plunged into the frigid Bering Sea on this day. The swim may be rescheduled if the ocean ice hasn’t sufficiently broken up.

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Ok ladies, listen up. Chances are pretty good you’ll be able to relate to this unusual “holiday.” June 22nd is Stupid Guy Thing Day! While the origins of this annual “holiday” are unknown, one can only wonder who “invented” it and why! But let’s be honest. We’ve all done stupid things in our lives regardless of age, race or gender. Really embarrassing, humiliating and downright stupid things, right? But no matter how hard we try, many of us gals just can’t figure out why some guys do the things they do. It’s almost like men and women really are from two entirely different planets! One way to celebrate would be to read the book Men are from Mars, Women are from Venus. After you’ve gone through it with a fine-tooth comb, highlight all the important things he should know, wrap it up and give it to him as a gift. Despite the silly things he may have done in the past, just remember all the good things he’s brought to your life and why it is you love him. And, as far as I know, there isn’t a ‘Stupid Girl Thing Day’ or anything of the sort. You don’t have to celebrate per se, but you can take the satisfaction, that the world recognises that guys do some pretty dumb stuff, so much so, that we take a day out of the year, to sit back and think “Guys really can be stupid, can’t they?” Please don’t blame the messenger. The folks at Wellcat, a rich source of off-beat holidays has declared June 22 as Stupid Guy Thing Day. “Women are always talking about [it], so here’s a day to commemorate it,” according to Wellcat. Apparently aren’t aware of a guy’s ability to celebrate his own stupid moves.

It’s National Chocolate Eclair Day! Chocolate Eclair is a sugary, sweet way to start your day. It’s a sweet, tasty way to end your day, too. Eclairs are a light, crisp pastry filled with a pastry cream. They are most often eaten as a dessert. They can be eaten at every meal, or as a snack. The eclair is a choux pastry, which creates a hollow center when baked. The interior is filled with a vanilla pudding-like substance and a thick layer of chocolate coats the top of the top. Eclairs originated in France. Did you know that “éclair” is the French word for lightning? It may have gotten its name from the “flash” of frosting that glistens across its top, though the direct connection between lightning and this delicious French pastry is unclear. The eclair has been a favorite treat since its creation in the 1860s, and it will undoubtedly continue to be a bakery shop staple for a long time. With its flaky dough and sweet, creamy filling, this dessert has become a global favorite. When baking the perfect chocolate éclair, sufficient steam is essential to the construction of the inner cavern that will be filled with vanilla cream. Pate a choux- the dough that becomes the outside of the éclair- is the ideal medium for generating that steam. No one knows who invented the éclair although gastronomic researchers suspect royal pastry chef Antonin Careme who lived from 1784 to 1833 may have had a hand in developing them. By 1884, chocolate éclairs had found their way into an American cookbook, their first identifiable appearance in this country.

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The United States Department of Justice was created by the U.S. Congress on this day in 1870.

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U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed into law the Servicemen’s Readjustment Act of 1944 on June 22, 1944. This is commonly known as the G.I. Bill.

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The Cuyahoga River is located in Northeast Ohio. Outside of Ohio, the river is most famous for being “the river that caught fire”. It did so on this day in 1969. This helped to spur the environmental movement in the late 1960s. Native Americans called this winding water “Cuyahoga,” which means ‘crooked river’ in an Iroquoian language. The Cuyahoga River at one time was one of the most polluted rivers in the United States. The reach from Akron to Cleveland was devoid of fish. At least 13 fires have been reported on the Cuyahoga River, the first occurring in 1868. The largest river fire in 1952 caused over $1 million in damage to boats and a riverfront office building. Fires erupted on the river several times between the 1952 fire and June 22, 1969, but a river fire that day captured the attention of Time magazine, which described the Cuyahoga as the river that “oozes rather than flows” and in which a person “does not drown but decays”. The fire did eventually spark major changes as well as the article from TIME, but in the immediate aftermath very little attention was given to the incident. Furthermore, the conflagration that sparked TIME’s outrage was in June 1969, but the pictures they displayed on the cover and as part of the article were from the much more dangerous 1952 fire. No pictures from the 1969 fire are known to exist. The 1969 Cuyahoga River fire helped spur an avalanche of water pollution control activities, resulting in the Clean Water Act, Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement, and the creation of the federal Environmental Protection Agency and the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OEPA). As a result, large point sources of pollution on the Cuyahoga have received significant attention from the OEPA in recent decades. These events are referred to in Randy Newman’s 1972 song “Burn On”, R.E.M.’s 1986 song “Cuyahoga”, and Adam Again’s 1992 song “River on Fire”.

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Some of the writers born June 22nd include:

Jacques Delille (1738), H. Rider Haggard (1856), William McDougall (1871), Edmund A. Chester (1897), Erich Maria Remarque (1898), Anne Morrow Lindbergh (1906), Sándor Weöres (1913), Géza Vermes (1922), Abbas Kiarostami (1940), Esther Rantzen (1940), Ed Bradley (1941), Brit Hume (1943), Octavia Butler (1947), Elizabeth Warren (1949), Danny Baker (1957), Wayne Federman (1959), Dan Brown (1964), Kambri Crews (1971), and Jai Rodriquez (1978).

Hitting Secrets of the Pros

Today’s deal of the day is Hitting Secrets of the Pros : Big League Sluggers Reveal The Tricks of Their Trade by Wayne Stewart. We have one new copy of this paperback available. This is the first book of its kind to approach the art of hitting from an anecdotal prospective. It gives the reader a great insight and instruction through interviews and historical research. A long list of big-league batters share their know-how here.

 

From the Back Cover

Get inside the minds of baseball’s best, past and present, for a behind-the-scenes look at how hitters think–and what they do to stay great at the plate.

“The secret of hitting is physical relaxation, mental concentration–and don’t hit the fly ball to center.”
–Stan Musial

Hitting, according to the immortal Ted Williams, is a science. But few would call it an exact science, and many would say it’s an art. Indeed, each player’s swing is his own unique creation. Whether it’s Ty Cobb’s unconventional grip or Stan Musial’s peek-a-boo batting stance, Tony Batista’s open stance or Ichiro Suzuki’s versatile approach at the plate, the art of hitting is hard to master–and those who do it well wisely guard their secrets of success. Until now.

In Hitting Secrets of the Pros, longtime baseball writer Wayne Stewart takes you beyond the basics and into the creative minds of the artists themselves, including Nomar Garciaparra, Reggie Jackson, Mark McGwire, Ken Griffey Jr., Cal Ripken Jr., Tony Gwynn, and many more. Through exclusive interviews, humorous anecdotes, and historical research, this unusual how-to book will provide you with keen insight and one-on-one instruction as big-leaguers reveal their secrets on:

  • Styles and stances

  • Preparations and routines

  • Attitudes and adjustments

  • Making the most out of practice

  • The latest enhancement technologies

  • The best batting equipment

  • And everything else you need to gain a competitive edge at the plate

Ray-Bradbury-There-are-worse-crimes-than-burning-books.-One-of-them-is-not-reading-them

Disclaimer:

Much of the information in this blog is taken directly from Wikipedia, Amazon, and other sources such as holidayinsights.com, which are directly linked to within the text. Images have been taken from various sources found via Facebook, Goodsearch.com and Google.
Village Book Shop and the blogger claim no credit for the information above.

Leave a comment

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Friday, June 21, 2013

Where is human nature so weak as in the bookstore?”
Henry Ward Beecher

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Welcome to summer. Are you enjoying the weather? On non-leap years (until 2039), this day marks the summer solstice in the northern hemisphere and the winter solstice in the southern hemisphere, and is the day of the year with the most hours of daylight in the northern hemisphere and the least hours of daylight in the southern hemisphere.

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June is Fight the Filthy Fly Month. Fight the Filthy Fly Month is held in observance of the poor horses and other farm animals that must endure the daily bites of filthy flies. Not only are these unsightly insects annoying, but they can also spread disease. In the hot summer months many farm animals will be bitten by horse flies and midges, not to mention the dangerous botfly. On June 21st, many celebrate St. Leufredus’ Day. (For those who keep track, St. Leufredus is the patron saint against flies.) The most common problem flies cause is pain and swelling around the bite. Horses may become unstable and unmanageable when bitten, which is harmful to both horse and rider. Unfortunately there is not any way to completely clear your barn or field of flies and mosquitoes. There are several steps to minimize the exposure of your horses to flies and mosquitoes. The first and most important step is minimizing the breeding grounds of these pests by clear any and all unused buckets that are holding water. Mosquitoes and flies breed in water and the larva is semi-aquatic. Next, you can try and limit high humidity grazing times by putting your horses out in the field in the evenings, and early mornings when flies and mosquitoes are less prominent. The only way to dramatically decrease the exposure to flies and mosquitoes is using pesticides, sprays and horse wear.


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The third friday of June is National Flip Flop Day. Flip-Flop Day encourages you to ‘free your feet’ by donning a pair of flip-flops in place of your normal shoes. Be careful though, whilst flip-flops are relaxing and great for resting your feet, many aren’t good for your posture or healthy to walk in for long periods! The day is organised by Tropical Smoothie Cafe, a franchise in the USA that wants us to ditch our shoes and socks and get our flip flops on! 2013 marks the 7th annual National Flip Flop Day. This day started as a thank you to the customers of Tropical Smoothie Cafe, but later evolved into a charity to raise money for Camp Sunshine to address the effects of a life threatening illness like cancer, kidney diseases and lupus on every member of the immediate family – the ill child, the parents and the siblings. Customers who visit any Tropical Smoothie Café across its 300 locations nationwide in between 2 pm to 7 pm on this special day sporting their flip flops will get a 24oz. Jetty Punch Smoothie for free. In return of a smoothie they will simply ask for a donation to send children to Camp Sunshine and through this the company donates $1 for every customer that wears flip flops to Camp Sunshine.

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June 21, 2013 (and every June 21) will be a day devoted to the sun and the many benefits of daylighting. What is daylighting, you ask? This term refers to the use of natural light to brighten an interior space, as opposed to electric lighting. Not only will it reduce your energy bills and carbon footprint, but studies have proven that daylighting can enhance mental and physical well-being, as well as boost concentration and energy levels. Sponsored by Solatube International (the leading manufacturer and marketer of Tubular Daylighting Devices) but serving as a public service, this special day celebrates daylight as the best quality illumination for a greener planet. This is a reminder to home and business owners to find a way to bring daylight indoors on the summer solstice, the longest day of the year.National Daylight Appreciation Day was created as a way to increase awareness about the benefits of incorporating daylight in all aspects of our lives. Since daylight is free and energy efficient (no electric lights needed), there is a movement afoot to incorporate it everywhere from homes and offices to colleges, universities and schools. The appreciation of daylight goes back practically as far as the history of humankind. The ancients relied on it to tell time, using sundials.

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On June 21 skateboarders around the globe celebrate the pure exhilaration, creativity, and spirit of one of the most influential activities in the world by blowing off all other obligations to go skateboarding. OK, most skateboarders do this every day of their lives, but this is just one more reason to blow off your television/computer/video games and go skateboarding! Skateboarders everywhere will show their love and support for skateboarding by holding fundraisers, contests, protests and demos. They’ll skate across cities, gather in skateparks, stream into their local skate shop and some will even revel in the solitary act of skateboarding alone at their favorite spot, all bringing together the skateboarding community in the grind heard around the world. The holiday began in 2003 or 2004 as an excuse for skateboarders to make skateboarding their top priority. Founded by the International Association of Skateboard Companies (IASC), Go Skateboarding Day gives passionate skateboarders as well as those who are simply inspired by skateboarding, the opportunity to drop everything and get on a skateboard. This is a cooperative of decentralized events that take place around the globe. Skateboard retailers, manufacturers, skateparks, distributors, organizations and individuals of all colors, creeds, and attitudes hold skateboarding events to celebrate the holiday. Skateboarders around the world create their own events and traditions to celebrate skateboarding. The name for the holiday possibly originated from the “No Skateboarding” signs which often has been changed to “Go Skateboarding.” by local skaters.

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Take Your Dog To Work Day® celebrates Dogs and Promotes Their Adoption. First celebrated in 1999, Pet Sitters International’s Take Your Dog To Work Day® (TYDTWDay®) was created to celebrate the great companions dogs make and to encourage their adoption from humane societies, animal shelters and breed rescue clubs. This annual event asks pet lovers to celebrate the humane-canine bond and promote pet adoption by encouraging their employers to support TYDTWDay. Employers are encouraged to open their workplace to employees’ four-legged friends on this one special day. Besides a sure-fire way to boost company morale, the national press garnered by Take Your Dog to Work Day is guaranteed to generate lots of good public relations for companies who choose to participate.

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World Humanist Day is a Humanist holiday celebrated annually around the world on the summer solstice. According to the International Humanist and Ethical Union (IHEU), the day is a way of spreading awareness of Humanism as a philosophical life stance and means to effect change in the world. It is also seen as a time for Humanists to gather socially and promote the positive values of Humanism. The holiday developed during the 1980s as several chapters of the American Humanist Association (AHA) began to celebrate it. At the time, the date on which it was celebrated varied from chapter to chapter, with selections such as the founding date of the IHEU, or other significant dates. From the late 1980s to the early 1990s, the AHA and IHEU passed resolutions declaring World Humanist Day to be on the summer solstice. The manner in which World Humanist Day is celebrated varies considerably among local Humanist groups, reflecting the individuality and non-dogmatism of Humanism as a whole.

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The Fête de la Musique’, also known as World Music Day, is a music festival taking place on June 21. World Music Day is a day on which the world celebrates the magical gift of music. Music is the soul of every human being. Fete de la Musique firstly took place in England. But now World Music Day is spread over the entire globe. Fete de la Musique is actually a Lebanese music festival. World Music Day was firstly initiated by France. It was firstly ideated by French Dance and Music director Maurice Fleuret for the sake of Minister of Culture Jack Lang during the time of 1981. Though the festival took place in the year 1982. In order to build peace worldwide by the means of music, this gala of music festival is celebrated joyfully worldwide. The festival has become an international phenomenon, celebrated on the same day in more than 460 cities in 110 countries.



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New Hampshire ratified the Constitution of the United States and was admitted as the 9th state in the United States on this day in 1788.

On this day in 1982, John Hinckley was found not guilty by reason of insanity for the attempted assassination of U.S. President Ronald Reagan.

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Some of the writers born June 21st include:

Increase Mather (1639), Charles Thomas Jackson (1805), William Stubbs (1825), Frans de Cort (1834), Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis (1839), Daniel Carter Beard (1850), Damrong Rajanubhab (1862), Heinrich Wölfflin (1864), Fyodor Gladkov (1883), Milward Kennedy (1894), Donald C. Peattie (1898), Jean-Paul Sartre (1905), Aleksandr Tvardovsky (1910), Mary McCarthy (1912), Vishnu Prabhakar (1912), James Joll (1918), Dee Molenaar (1918), Gérard Pelletier (1919), Jacques Hébert (1923), Bernard Ingham (1932), Françoise Sagan (1935), John W. Dower (1938), Marjorie Margolies-Mezvinsky (1942), Henry S. Taylor (1942), Adam Zagajewski (1945), Trond Kirkvaag (1946), Fernando Savater (1947), Ian McEwan (1948), Andrzej Sapkowski (1948), Anne Carson (1950), Robert Menasse (1954), Berkeley Breathed (1957), Rudi Bakhitiar (1966), Alon Hilu (1972), and Natasha Desborough (1974).

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We remember three authors today on the anniversary of their passing.

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Niccolò di Bernardo dei Machiavelli was an Italian historian, politician, diplomat, philosopher, humanist, and author who lived from May 3, 1469 until June 21, 1527. He was based in Florence during the Renaissance. He was a founder of modern political science, and more specifically political ethics. He also wrote comedies, carnival songs, and poetry. His personal correspondence is renowned in the Italian language. He wrote his masterpiece, The Prince, after the Medici had recovered power and he no longer held a position of responsibility in Florence. His moral and ethical beliefs led to the creation of the word machiavellianism which has since been used to describe one of the three dark triad personalities in psychology. Machiavelli was taught grammar, rhetoric, and Latin, and became a prolific Chef. It is thought that he did not learn Greek, even though Florence was at the time one of the centers of Greek scholarship in Europe. Machiavelli died in 1527 at the age of 58. He was buried at the Church of Santa Croce in Florence, Italy. An epitaph honoring him is inscribed on his monument. The Latin legend reads: TANTO NOMINI NULLUM PAR ELOGIUM (“so great a name (has) no adequate praise” or “no eulogy(would be appropriate to) such a great name”). Commentators such as Leo Strauss have gone so far as to name Machiavelli as the deliberate originator of modernity itself. Others have argued that Machiavelli is only a particularly interesting example of trends which were happening around him. In any case Machiavelli presented himself at various times as someone reminding Italians of the old virtues of the Romans and Greeks, and other times as someone promoting a completely new approach to politics. Scholars have argued that Machiavelli was a major indirect and direct influence upon the political thinking of the Founding Fathers of the United States. Machiavelli is a major character in the novel seriesThe Secrets of the Immortal Nicholas Flamel by Michael Scott.

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Timothy Irving Frederick Findley was a Canadian novelist and playwright who lived from October 30, 1930 until June 21, 2002. He was also informally known by the nickname Tiff orTiffy, an acronym of his initials. He attended a boarding school until he had to leave during grade 10 for health reasons. He pursued a career in the arts, studying dance and acting, and had significant success as an actor before turning to writing. Though Findley had declared his homosexuality as a teenager, he married actress/photographer Janet Reid in 1959, but the union lasted only three months and was dissolved by divorce or annulment two years later. Eventually he became the domestic partner of writer Bill Whitehead, whom he met in 1962. Findley’s first two novels were originally published in Britain and the United States after having been rejected by Canadian publishers. He was a founding member and chair of the Writers’ Union of Canada, and a president of the Canadian chapter of PEN International. His writing was typical of the Southern Ontario Gothic style — Findley, in fact, first invented its name— and was heavily influenced by Jungian psychology. Mental illness, gender and sexuality were frequent recurring themes in his work. His characters often carried dark personal secrets, and were often conflicted — sometimes to the point of psychosis — by these burdens. Findley was an active mentor to a number of young Canadian writers. In the final years of Findley’s life, declining health led him to move his Canadian residence to Stratford, Ontario, and Stone Orchard was purchased by Canadian dancer Rex Harrington. Findley died on June 21, 2002, in Brignoles, France, not far from his house in Cotignac.



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Leon Marcus Uris was an American novelist, known for his historical fiction and the deep research that went into his novels, who was born August 3, 1924 and passed away ten years ago today. At age six, Uris reportedly wrote an operetta inspired by the death of his dog. Uris attended schools in Norfolk, Virginia and Baltimore, but never graduated from high school, and failed English three times. When Uris was seventeen and in his senior year of high school, the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor and Uris enlisted in the United States Marine Corps. While recuperating from malaria in San Francisco, he met Betty Beck, a Marine sergeant; they married in 1945. Coming out of the service, he worked for a newspaper, writing in his spare time. His best-known work may be Exodus, which was published in 1958. Most sources indicate Uris, motivated by an intense interest in Israel, financed his research for the novel by selling the film rights in advance to MGM and by writing newspaper articles about the Sinai campaign. It is said that the book involved two years of research, and involved thousands of interviews. Uris was married three times: to Betty Beck, with whom he had three children, from 1945 through their divorce in 1968; Marjorie Edwards in 1969, who committed suicide by gunshot a year later. His third wife was Jill Peabody, with whom he had two children. They married in 1970, when she was 22 years old and he was 45; the couple divorced in 1989. Leon Uris died of renal failure at his Long Island home on Shelter Island in 2003, aged 78.

 

hollywood in the 1940s

Today we are offering a hard to come by book at a reduced price that once belonged to a library. Hollywood in the Nineteen Forties: The Stars Own Story edited by Ivy C. Wilson is a wonderful book with a textbook binding. Contains a forward by Liz Smith. This book has all the usual library stamps and tags.


malcome x one book

Disclaimer: Much of the information in this blog is taken directly from Wikipedia, Amazon, and other sources such as holidayinsights.com, which are directly linked to within the text. Images have been taken from various sources found via Facebook, Goodsearch.com and Google.
Village Book Shop and the blogger claim no credit for the information above.

Leave a comment

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