Wednesday, June 5, 2013

Good friends, good books, and a sleepy conscience: this is the ideal life.”
― Mark Twain

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Happy Wednesday to you all. You’ve made it half way through the week! That means it’s the day before the day before the last day of the work week. Yay!

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Sports America Kids Month was initiated to promote healthy thinking and physical fitness among all American children. Exciting sports and weekend outings are set up throughout the month of June so that kids can have a different athletic lesson every time out.

 

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June is Student Safety Month. The purpose is to heighten the awareness of safety and of making sound decisions following graduations, parties, proms, and other special events. It encourages young people everywhere not to drink and drive and to use good judgment when celebrating throughout the month.

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Annually the first Wednesday of June is National Running Day. This is a day when runners everywhere declare their passion for running. Wherever we are and whomever we’re with, we run—fast or slow, alone or with others, all over town or just around the block. It is a coast-to-coast celebration of a sport and activity that’s simple, inexpensive, and fun. It’s the perfect way for longtime runners to reaffirm their love of running and for beginners to kick off a lifetime and life-changing commitment.

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The first Wednesday is also National Tailors Day. If you’re always seeming to be looking marvelous, you may be wanting to send out a thank you on National Tailors‘ Day. Even in today’s more casual world, nothing seems to bring out your best like a well-tailored suit. Celebrate today by dressing up and thanking the person who keeps you looking good.

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Today is World Environment Day. World Environment Day (‘WED’) is celebrated every year on June 5th to raise global awareness of the need to take positive environmental action. It is run by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). The first World Environment Day was in 1973. World Environment Day is hosted every year by a different city with a different theme and is commemorated with an international exposition in the week of June 5th. Each year, a theme is selected, the theme for this year is “Think. Eat. Save. Reduce your foodprint.” Each year a different location is selected to host World Environment Day celebrations, Mongolia was selected for 2013.

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If you’re in the mood for something sweet to eat, you’re in luck! Today is National Gingerbread Day! This yummy holiday is celebrated annually on June 5 although some calendars observe the holiday on November 21st. Gingerbread actually refers to a number of sweet confections that include ginger, whether a moist loaf of bread or a crispy cookie. While the origins of National Gingerbread Day are unknown, folks have been enjoying this sweet treat for centuries. Legend has it that Gregory of Nicopolis, an Armenian monk, took the recipe to Europe in 992 and taught priests how to make it and the rest, as they say, is history.

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Houston, Texas was incorporated by the Republic of Texas on June 5, 1837.

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Harriet Beecher Stowe’s anti-slavery serial, Uncle Tom’s Cabin or, Life Among the Lowly began a ten-month run in the National Era abolitionist newspaper on this day in 1851.

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Elvis Presley introduced his new single, “Hound Dog”, on The Milton Berle Show on June 5, 1956. His suggestive hip movements were scandalizing to the audience.

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On this day in 1968, U.S. presidential candidate Robert F. Kennedy was shot at the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles, California by Palestinian Sirhan Sirhan. Kennedy died the following day.

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On June 5, 1981, The Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that five people in Los Angeles, California had a rare form of pneumonia seen only in patients with weakened immune systems, in what turned out to be the first recognized cases of AIDS.


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Some of the writers born June 5th include:

Pu Songling, (1640), Thomas Chippendale (1718), Federico García Lorca (1898), Otis Barton (1899), Arthur Powell Davies (1902), Richard Scarry (1919), Cornelius Ryan (1920), Alifa Rifaat (1930), Christy Brown (1932), Bill Moyers (1934), Hélène Cixous (1937), Margaret Drabble (1939), Spalding Gray (1941), Matthew Lesko (1943), David Hare (1947), Ken Follett (1949), J. J. Bittenbinder (1950), Abraham Sarmiento, Jr. (1941), Suze Orman (1951), Margo Lanagan (1960), Jeff Garlin (1962), Lisa Cholodenko (1964), Rick Riordan (1964), Chuck Klosterman (1972), Kristin Gore (1977), and Jade Goody (1981).

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We want to take a moment to pay tribute to a few authors on the anniversary of their passing.

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Stephen Crane was an American novelist, short story writer, poet and journalist who lived from November 1, 1871 until June 5, 1900. Prolific throughout his short life, he wrote notable works in the Realist tradition as well as early examples of American Naturalism and Impressionism. He is recognized by modern critics as one of the most innovative writers of his generation. Crane’s first novel was the 1893 Bowery tale Maggie: A Girl of the Streets, which critics generally consider the first work of American literary Naturalism. He won international acclaim for his 1895 Civil War novel The Red Badge of Courage, which he wrote without any battle experience. During the final years of his life, he covered conflicts in Greece and lived in England with Cora, where he befriended writers such as Joseph Conrad and H. G. Wells. Plagued by financial difficulties and ill health, Crane died of tuberculosis in a Black Forest sanatorium at the age of 28. At the time of his death, Crane had become an important figure in American literature. He was nearly forgotten, however, until two decades later when critics revived interest in his life and work. Stylistically, Crane’s writing is characterized by vivid intensity, distinctive dialects, and irony. Common themes involve fear, spiritual crises and social isolation. His writing made a deep impression on 20th century writers, most prominent among them Ernest Hemingway, and is thought to have inspired the Modernists and the Imagists.

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Primarily remembered as the 40th President of the United States, Ronald Reagan was also an actor and wrote a couple autobiographical books and his son, Ron Reagan as well as other writers have written about this American legend. Ronald Reagan was born February 6, 1911. Reagan had Bachelor degrees in economics and sociology. He moved to Iowa after college to become a radio broadcaster, then, in 1937, moved to L.A. Where he began his acting career. He served as President of the Screen Actors Guild and later as a spokesman for General Electric; his start in politics occurred during his work for GE. Originally a member of the Democratic Party, his positions began shifting rightward in the 1950s, and he switched to the Republican Party in 1962. He became governor of California in 1966. He won the United States Presidential election in 1980, defeating Jimmy Carter. As president, Reagan implemented sweeping new political and economic initiatives. His supply-side economic policies, dubbed “Reaganomics”, advocated reducing tax rates to spur economic growth, controlling the money supply to reduce inflation, deregulation of the economy, and reducing government spending. In his first term he survived an assassination attempt, took a hard line against labor unions, announced a new War on Drugs, and ordered an invasion of Grenada. He was re-elected in a landslide in 1984, proclaiming that it was “Morning in America”. His second term was primarily marked by foreign matters, such as the ending of the Cold War, the 1986 bombing of Libya, and the revelation of the Iran-Contra affair. Reagan left office in 1989. In 1994, the former president disclosed that he had been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease earlier in the year. Reagan died of pneumonia, brought on by Alzheimer’s disease at his home in Bel Air, California, on the afternoon of June 5, 2004. A short time after his death, Nancy Reagan released a statement saying, “My family and I would like the world to know that President Ronald Reagan has died after 10 years of Alzheimer’s disease at 93 years of age. We appreciate everyone’s prayers.” At the time of his death, Reagan was the longest-lived president in U.S. history, having lived 93 years and 120 days (2 years, 8 months, and 23 days longer than John Adams, whose record he surpassed). He is now the second longest-lived president, just 45 days fewer than Gerald Ford.

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One year ago today we lost Ray Bradbury, the American fantasy, science fiction, horror and mystery fiction writer. Bradbury was one of the most celebrated 20th-century American writers. Many of Bradbury’s works have been adapted into comic books, television shows and films. The Bradbury family moved to Los Angeles, California in 1934. Bradbury suffered a stroke in 1999 that left him partially dependent on a wheelchair for mobility. Despite this he continued to write, and had even written an essay on his inspiration for writing for The New Yorker published only a week prior to his death. Bradbury made regular appearances at science fiction conventions until 2009, when he retired from the circuit. Bradbury was a strong supporter of public library systems, and helped to raise money to prevent the closure of several in California due to budgetary cuts. He exhibited skepticism with regard to modern technology by resisting the conversion of his work into e-books and stating that “We have too many cellphones. We’ve got too many internets. We have got to get rid of those machines. We have too many machines now.” When the publishing rights for Fahrenheit 451 came up for renewal in December 2011, Bradbury conceded that the work could be published in an electronic form— provided that the publisher, Simon & Schuster, allowed the e-book to be digitally downloaded by any library patron. The title remains the only book in the Simon & Schuster catalog where this is possible. Bradbury died in Los Angeles, California, on June 5, 2012, at the age of 91, after a lengthy illness.

The Story of Christianity

Today’s sale is for a rather large used hard cover book that was published in 1999. The book The Story of Christianity: The Early Church to the Present Day by Justo L González. This book is 843 pages long. We have slashed the price in half for one week only! According to Amazon: 

Both volumes now now combined into one: Volume 1, The Early Church to the Dawn of the Reformation and Volume 2, The Reformation to the Present Day. In Volume 1 “Gonzalez skillfully weaves in relevant details from the lives of prominent figures from the Apostles to John Wycliffe, tracing out core theological issues and developments as reflected in the lives and struggles of leading thinkers within the various traditions of the church. The Story of Christianity demonstrates at each point what new challenges and opportunities faced the church and how Christians struggled with the various options open to them, thereby shaping the future direction of the church”…. In Volume 2 “The interpretive overview of The Story of Christianity includes a thorough and timely analysis of the growth and maturation of Christianity, including events in Europe, the United States, and Latin America – the latter an area too often neglected in church histories, yet increasingly vital to an understanding of Christianity’s historical development, present situation, and future options” .

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Disclaimer: Much of the information in this blog is taken directly from Wikipedia, Amazon, and sources linked to within the text. Images have been taken from various sources found via Goodsearch.com and Google. Village Book Shop and the blogger claim no credit for the information above.


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