Saturday June 8, 2013

A book without words is like love without a kiss; it’s empty.”
― 
Andrew Wolfe

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June is International Men’s Month. This program was initiated in 1996 to increase media and local community awareness of the many unique issues that impact men’s lives and that are of concern to the people who love them. In an effort to promote positive changes in male roles and relationships, a different issue is addressed each day of the month during June, and information and resources on that issue are provided on the sponsor’s website.

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National Accordion Awareness Month (NAAM) is in June. It was established in 1989 and dedicated to all things accordion. To accordion lovers, this month is all about professing their love of their favorite folded noise-making wind bag. Invented in the 19th century, the accordion is comprised of keys, valves, reeds and a squeezebox. When the keys are pressed and the squeezebox is expanded or contrasted, it pushes air through reeds. To this day the accordion remains one of the most recognized instruments in both look and sound. There are more genres than polka that are using the accordion. Whether it is indie rock, (The DecemberistsArcade Fire) various forms of punk, (Gogol BordelloThe Pogues) rock and roll, (John Cougar Mellencamp,Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band) alternative rock, (Panic! At The Disco,They Might Be Giants) or even various forms of metal (AgallochTurisas)  you’ve probably listened to accordion music without realizing it. The piano accordion is the official musical instrument of the city of San Francisco and has been since 1990. Actress Lucy Liu plays the accordion. Billy Joel and Barry Manilow also play the accordion. The accordion is a member of the reed family, not the keyboard family. The first United States-made piano accordion (the ones with the keys on it) was manufactured in San Francisco back in 1907. When people think of an accordion, they usually envision that large, black monstrosity with piano keys on one side and about a thousand buttons on the other side. However, the accordion family also includes Cajun button boxes, chromatic and diatonic button accordions, the concertina, the bayan, and the bandoneon. China is the largest manufacturer and exporter of accordions in the world.

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June is also World Naked Bike Ride Month in the Northern Hemisphere. June 8
th and July 27th are the two major riding event days. There are two northern ride dates because June can still be cold in many cities. The ride is “as bare as you dare” – full nudity is not mandatory. The purpose is to celebrate cycling and the human body. The naked bike ride demonstrates the vulnerability of cyclists on the road and is a protest against oil dependency.

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Today is Upsy Daisy Day. Start your day off with a smile, no matter what challenges lie ahead. Stephanie West Allen, the holiday’s creator, wants us all to remember to be grateful for each day. “Feeling gratitude will smooth out the landscape so you can create the new paths. Replace the thoughts of sickness with thoughts of health, poverty thoughts with wealth thoughts, dread thoughts with dream thoughts,” according to Allen.

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Happy Best Friends Day. Best Friend Day is a time to enjoy and appreciate your best friend. It’s a day to honor and cherish the relationship. If you’re lucky, you have a best friend. If you are real lucky, you have a number of best friends. Best friends are very, very special people. You spend countless hours with your best friend going to events and activities, or just hanging out. You share secrets, hopes, dreams, aspirations, and disappointments with your best friend. You can have a couple at the same time, or several over time. Friends come and go for a variety of reasons. It’s the result of many things, including moving, changing schools or jobs, and more. We hope that you are lucky enough to have a number of best friends over the years. Spend some time with your best friend today. Today is a good day to call an old best friend that you’ve lost touch with.

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June 8th is Name Your Poison Day, a day to make a choice. The term “Name Your Poison” is commonly used to suggest that you select among a number of options. This term has a negative connotation. The origin of this term is unknown. But, at the time, it probably referred to some unhappy choice. It is commonly used when asking someone what type of alcoholic drink they want. But, it is also used to refer to any choice of options, good or bad. For example, “Name Your Poison” may refer to selecting an ice cream flavor, a dessert choice, etc. Celebrate today by making a decision….. Name Your Poison.


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Today is World Oceans Day, which had been unofficially celebrated every Eighth of June since its original proposal in 1992 by Canada at the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. It was officially recognized by the United Nations in 2008. Since then it has been coordinated internationally by The Ocean Project and the World Ocean Network with greater success and global participation each year. World Oceans Day is an opportunity every year to honor the world’s oceans, celebrate the products the ocean provides such as seafood as well as marine life itself for aquariums, pets, and also a time to appreciate its own intrinsic value. The ocean also provides sea-lanes for international trade. Global pollution and over-consumption of fish have resulted in drastically dwindling population of the majority of species. The two-year theme for 2013 and 2014 is together we have the power to protect the ocean!

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James Madison introduced twelve propsed amendments to the United States Constitution in the House of Representatives on June 8, 1789. By 1791, ten of them were ratified by the state legislatures and becae the Bill of Rights; another was eventually ratified in 1992 to become the 27th Amendment.

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Tennessee seceded from the Union in the American Civil War on this day in 1861.

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Theordore Roosevelt signed the Antiquities Act into law on June 8, 1906. This authorized the President to restrict the use of certain parcels of public land with historical or conservation value.

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Universal Pictures was incorporated on this day in 1912 by Carl Laemmle.

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George Orwell‘s Nineteen Eighty-Four was published 64 years ago today.

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Some of the writers born June 8th include:

Gabriello Chiabrera (1552), John G. Bennett (1897), Marguerite Yourcenar (1903), Gwen Harwood (1920), Malcolm Boyd (1923), Lyn Nofziger (1924), Joan Rivers (1933), Sara Paretsky (1947), Teresa Strasser (1970), Troy Duffy (1971), and Maria Menounos (1978).

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Also born on June 8th were two First Ladies of the United States. Ida Saxton McKinley was born on this day in 1847. She was the wife of William McKinley and the 25th First Lady of the United States. Barbara Bush was born June 8th, 1925. She is the wife of George H.W. Bush, making her the 41st First Lady of the United States. She is also the mother of the 43rd President, George W. Bush and of the 43rd Governor of Florida, Jeb Bush. Previously she had served as Second Lady of the United States.

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The English computer scientist and engineer who invented the World Wide Web, Tim Berners-Lee, is celebrating his 58th birthday today.

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Today we take a moment to remember two authors, Thomas Paine and George Turner who passed away on the eighth of June.

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Thomas Paine lived from 1737 until June 8, 1809. He was an English-American political activist, author, political theorist and revolutionary. As the author of two highly influential pamphlets at the start of the American Revolution, he inspired the Patriots in 1776 to declare independence from Britain. His ideas reflected Enlightenment era rhetoric of transnational human rights. Paine emigrated to the British American colonies in 1774 with the help of Benjamin Franklin and he arrived in time to participate in the American Revolution. His principal contributions were the powerful, widely read pamphlet Common Sense (1776), the all-time best-selling American book that advocated colonial America’s independence from the Kingdom of Great Britain, and The American Crisis (1776-83), a pro-revolutionary pamphlet series. He became notorious because of The Age of Reason(1793-94), his book that advocates deism, promotes reason and freethinking, and argues against institutionalized religion in general and Christian doctrine in particular. Paine’s later years established him as “a missionary of world revolution.” Paine was an enthusiastic supporter of the French Revolution, and was granted honorary French citizenship. Despite his inability to speak French, he was elected to the National Convention. Paine was arrested and imprisoned in December 1793. Arrested in France, Paine protested and claimed that he was a citizen of America, which was an ally of Revolutionary France, rather than of Great Britain, which was by that time at war with France. Paine narrowly escaped execution. Paine was released in November 1794 largely because of the work of the new American Minister to France, James Monroe, who successfully argued the case for Paine’s American citizenship. Paine died at the age of 72, in Greenwich Village, New York City on the morning of June 8, 1809. Although the original building is no longer there, the present building has a plaque noting that Paine died at this location. After his death, Paine’s body was brought to New Rochelle, but as the Quakers would not allow it to be buried in their grave-yard per his last will, so his remains were buried under a walnut tree on his farm. In 1819, the English agrarian radical journalist William Cobbett dug up his bones and transported them back to England with the intention to give Paine a heroic reburial on his native soil, but this never came to pass. The bones were still among Cobbett’s effects when he died over twenty years later, but were later lost. There is no confirmed story about what happened to them after that, although down the years various people have claimed to own parts of Paine’s remains, such as his skull and right hand. At the time of his death, most American newspapers reprinted the obituary notice from the New York Citizen, which read in part: “He had lived long, did some good and much harm.” Only six mourners came to his funeral, two of whom were black, most likely freedmen. Thomas Paine’s writing greatly influenced his contemporaries and, especially, the American revolutionaries. His books provoked an upsurge in Deism in America, but in the long term inspired philosophic and working-class radicals in the UK and US.

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George Reginald Turner was born October 15, 1916 and lived until June 8, 1997. He was an Australian writer and critic, best known for the science fiction novels written in the later part of his career. He was notable for being a “late bloomer” in science fiction (by the field’s standards). His first SF story and novel appeared in 1978, when he was in his early sixties. By this point, however, he had already achieved considerable success as a mainstream novelist and as a literary critic. During the 1970s, he gained considerable reputation for his meticulous and well-considered reviews and criticism of science fiction, among his first critical publications in the field being in SF fan magazine SF Commentary, edited by Bruce Gillespie. Over a decade after his previous publication of a full length work of fiction, he published ‘Beloved Son’ (1978), his first science fiction novel. Before his death he published six more science fiction novels. Turner’s science fiction narratives are remarkable for their detailed extrapolation and their invariably earnest approach to moral and social issues. Much of his work has a strongly “Australian” feel, and it sometimes incorporates references to the Aboriginal peoples of his country. Despite his late start, at death he was arguably one of the elder statesmen of Australian science fiction.

Harry Potter Page to Screen

We are putting an absolutely stunning book on sale for this week. Harry Potter Page to Screen: The Complete Filmaking Journey by Bob McCabe is a large hardcover book that measures 13 x 9.6 x 1.8 inches and was published in October of 2011. It is 540 pages. Our copy never saw the store shelves and is in New, unhandled condition. We are further reducing are price for just one week only. Get this beautiful book while you can. Amazon describes it as follows:

Harry Potter: Page to Screen opens the doors to Hogwarts castle and the wizarding world of Harry Potter to reveal the complete behind-the-scenes secrets, techniques, and over-the-top artistry that brought J.K. Rowling’s acclaimed novels to cinematic life. Developed in collaboration with the creative team behind the celebrated movie series, this deluxe, 500-plus page compendium features exclusive stories from the cast and crew, hundreds of never-before-seen photographs and concept illustrations sourced from the closed film sets, and rare memorabilia. As the definitive look at the magic that made cinematic history, Page to Screen is the ultimate collectible, perfect for Muggles everywhere. 

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Disclaimer: Much of the information in this blog is taken directly from Wikipedia, Amazon, and sources linked to within the text. Images have been taken from various sources found via Goodsearch.com and Google. Village Book Shop and the blogger claim no credit for the information above.

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1 Comment

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One response to “Saturday June 8, 2013

  1. Thanks for mentioning my Upsy Daisy Day. I hope you enjoyed your UDD.

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