Friends, Freedom, Red Ribbons, Information, Speech, Food and more

Monday, October 21st, 2013

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Thursday, October 24, 2013

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“What she was finding also was how one book led to another, doors kept opening wherever she turned and the days weren’t long enough for the reading she wanted to do.”
― Alan BennettThe Uncommon Reader

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Yet another weekend came and went. We hope your work week is a good one, with plenty of time to enjoy a good book.

 

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This Week:

National Friends of Libraries Week

Friends of Libraries groups have their very own national week of celebration! United for Libraries have coordinated the eighth annual National Friends of Libraries Week Oct. 20-26, 2013. The celebration offers a two-fold opportunity to celebrate Friends. Use the time to creatively promote the group in the community, to raise awareness, and to promote membership. This is also an excellent opportunity for your library and Board of Trustees to recognize the Friends for their help and support of the library.

 

red ribbon books

Red Ribbon Week

The National Family Partnership organized the first Nationwide Red Ribbon Campaign®. Since its beginning in 1985, the Red Ribbon has touched the lives of millions of people around the world. In response to the murder of DEA Agent Enrique Camarena, angered parents and youth in communities across the country began wearing Red Ribbons as a symbol of their commitment to raise awareness of the killing and destruction cause by drugs in America.

In 1988, NFP sponsored the first National Red Ribbon Week® celebration. Today, the Red Ribbon serves as a catalyst to mobilize communities to educate youth and encourage participation in drug prevention activities. Since that time, the campaign has reached millions of U.S. children and families.

For more information, please visit RedRibbon.org

 

 

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Freedom of Speech Week

In troubled times more than half a century ago, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt uttered the visionary principles that would inspire a nation and guide America through World War II and into the 21st century. He called them the “Four Freedoms” – Freedom of Speech and Expression, Freedom of Religion, Freedom From Want, and Freedom From Fear. Over the past 60 years, these ideals have survived, and triumphed. Today, free speech defines our American way of life. It is indeed a triumph of our democracy – a freedom to be celebrated. Free Speech Week IS that celebration!  At a time when scores of worthwhile causes are remembered with special weeks or even months, the annual celebration of free speech – the cornerstone of our democracy – is vital and long overdue. By celebrating freedom of speech for a full week every year, Free Speech Week will help ensure that free speech remains “The Language of America.” Free Speech Week (FSW) is celebrated during the third week of October every year.

 

 

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Pastoral Care Week

This year Pastoral Care Week has the theme of “Prophetic Voice” and takes place through October 26th. Pastoral Care Week gives opportunities for organizations and institutions of all kinds and types to recognize the spiritual caregivers in their midst and the ministry which the caregivers provide.

 

angel reading
National Respiratory Care Week

In the spirit of celebration and community services, the American Association for Respiratory Care and its members signify Respiratory Care Week, an annual event that recognizes the respiratory care profession and promotes awareness of lung health issues and practices. Respiratory care professionals from around the world come together in their workplaces and communities to host activities to honor and reward respiratory therapists, encourage patients and their families in their battles against lung disease, educate the community, build the desire in others to enter the respiratory care profession, and maximize personal and professional skills with new resources.

 

pearl glasses

National Massage Therapy Week

National Massage Therapy Awareness Week (NMTAW), part of American Massage Therapy Association’s ongoing Consumer Awareness Program, is an opportunity to talk to the community about the health benefits of massage. This year is the 17th annual NMTAW.

 

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National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week

This year’s National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week theme, “Lead-Free Kids for a Healthy Future,” underscores the importance of the many ways parents can reduce a child’s exposure to lead and prevent its serious health effects. This is always observed the third week of October and is now an International event.

 

three standing books

National Hospital and Health-System Pharmacy Week

National Hospital & Health-System Pharmacy Week acknowledges the invaluable contributions that pharmacists and technicians make to patient care in our nation’s health care institutions. It is an ideal time for pharmacy departments to acknowledge and celebrate their achievements in ensuring safe and effective medication use in their institutions and to share those accomplishments with patients, other health professionals, and the community.

 

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Ally Week

GLSEN, the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network, is the leading national education organization focused on ensuring safe schools for all students. Established nationally in 1990, GLSEN envisions a world in which every child learns to respect and accept all people, regardless of sexual orientation, gender identity or gender expression. GLSEN and students across the country, often as members of Gay-Straight Alliances (GSAs) or similar student clubs, organize Ally Week, this year it’s October 21-25, 2013 in schools and communities nationwide. Ally Week is a week for students to engage in a national conversation and action to become better allies to LGBT youth. Allies are people who do not identify as LGBT students, but support this community by standing against the bullying and harassment LGBT youth face in school. Allies can be straight or cis gender identified youth and adults, or LGBT identified adults! Anyone who takes a student against anti-LGBT bullying and harassment can be an ally.

 

school bus reading

National School Bus Safety Week

The third full week of October is set aside as National School Bus Safety Week to focus attention on school bus safety—from the standpoint of the bus drivers, students and the motoring public.

 

 

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National Nuclear Science Week

National Nuclear Science Week is a national, broadly observed week-long celebration to focus local, regional and national interest on all aspects of nuclear science. During the week, educators, students, employers and the community participate in a national recognition of how nuclear science plays a vital role in our lives. Activities during this week are intended to build awareness of the contributions of the nuclear science industry and those who work in it every day.

 

books in field

 

 

Monday:

 

 

The first display of the word “Liberty” on a flag was on October 21, 1774. It was raised by colonists in Taunton, Massachusetts in defiance of British rule in Colonial America.

 

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The first edition of the Ernest Hemingway novel  For Whom the Bell Tolls was published October 21, 1940.

 

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Celebration of The Mind Day

Martin Gardner passed away on May 22, 2010.  He wanted no memorials, but he expressed a desire for the Gatherings For Gardner to continue.
In this spirit the Gathering 4 Gardner Foundation will celebrate Martin’s life and work, and continue his pursuit of a playful and fun approach to Mathematics, Science, Art, Magic, Puzzles and all of his other interests and writings. The first Martin Gardner Global Celebration of Mind Gathering took place in different locations around the world on October 21, 2010, which would have been Martin’s 96th Birthday.  Continuing with the tradition, the second and third took place on or around October 21st.

 

children made readers in laps

Global Iodine Deficiency Disorder (IDD) Prevention Day

Iodine Deficiency Disorder (IDD) is one of the most preventable and prevailing micronutrient deficiencies which mainly affect small children and pregnant women. This very serious issue can even result in brain disorders and low mental development among the people and hence it has become important to make the world aware about the Iodine Deficiency Disorders and the problems associated with it. The Global Iodine Deficiency Disorder Day does just the thing by making the people aware of it and taking steps towards educating the people and introducing healthy eating habits which helps to get closer towards a world with minimal number of people who suffers because they haven’t got the adequate amount of the micronutrient in their diet. This day, which is dedicated towards decreasing the rate of the IDD around the world and in creating a world with no one who suffers because they are deficient in iodine is very important in today’s world as the Global Iodine Deficiency Disorder Day does it share in bringing down IDD.  The deficiency in women while she was carrying can result in a child with physical and mental retardation or sometime may even result in stillbirth or abortion. Though IDD has lowered in number over the years due to iodisation of salt and awareness programs, even today one sixth of the world population is still under risk of the disorder and the ratio is even more in the poor and striving countries like Africa and India.  To prevent the iodine deficiency, it is very important to educate the people about the Iodine Deficiency Disorders that they and their kids might get if not careful about their diet and nutrition. They can also be educated on the food stuff rich in iodine and the best way to ensure that they are having a balanced diet. The poor should also be educated. They should know that it is not always a costly foodstuff that can make them healthy, a chart of the best affordable and nutritive food items can be given to them so they can easily get all they want without losing much of their money to stay healthy.

 

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Information Overload Day

Did you know that over 25% of your work week is sucked away by distractions, email, and over-information? What would you do if you had that time back? On October 21, 2013, we take a pause to mark the annual Information Overload Day, and seek solutions that will bring back that productivity. What will YOU do to mark this occasion?

 

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National Clean Your Virtual Desktop Day

Remember when you got your computer, and the tidy, empty desktop looked clean, productive and well-organized? Take a look now – we’re willing to bet that it’s strewn with icons that you barely ever use, that there are documents and files sprawling around folders that are in desperate need of organization. Clean Your Virtual Desktop Day, the third Monday of October each year, demands that you put things away, delete things you don’t need, and to put some structure in place to stop things getting quite so messy before the same time next year…

 

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Reptile Awareness Day

Habitat loss and the threat of extinction are significant concerns in the world of reptillian life. Reptile Day promotes awareness of all things reptillian, encouraging learning about different types of reptiles, their natural environments and ecological challenges.

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International Day of the Nacho

Have you ever thought about who created the first plate of nachos? The story goes that in 1943 several army wives left the army base at Fort Dunan for a fun girls shopping day in Piedras Negras, Mexico. When they finally stopped for dinner, they found out that the restaurant had already closed. However, the maitre d’, Ignacio Anaya, decided to cook something up from what he had on hand so that the ladies wouldn’t go hungry. Ignacio, nicknamed “Nacho,” sliced some tortillas into triangles, covered them in shredded cheddar, and stuck them in the oven. Then he added some sliced jalapenos and presented the hungry ladies with “Nacho’s especiales.”

 

 

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Tuesday:

International Stuttering Awareness Day

October 22nd was designated International Stuttering Awareness Day (ISAD) in 1998. The day is intended to raise public awareness of the millions of people –one percent of the world’s population –who have the speech disorder of stuttering, also known as stammering. The self-help groups and the national associations become very active and creative when International Stuttering Awareness Day approaches. The 2013 theme is “People Who Stutter Supporting Each Other”.

 

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Toastmasters International was founded October 22, 1924.

 

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Nikola Tesla exposed his six new inventions including a motor with one phase electricity on October 22, 1927.

 

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Fechner Day

October 22nd is Fechner Day, celebrated by Psychophysicists. This day honors the pioneering work of Dr. Gustav Fechner, a 19th century German scientist and philosopher. This day commemorates the morning of October 22, 1850 when Gustav Fechner had an “Aha!” moment and realized that there was a direct, quantitative relationship between the intensity of physical stimulus and its perception by the human mind. Fechner’s “Aha!” moment inspired him to conduct groundbreaking research in the field of psychophysics, which studies the relationship between physical stimulus and psychological perception.

Today, over 150 years later, psychophysicists from all over the world continue to tease out the complex dynamics of the mind-body relationship. Fechner’s law defines how much sound, light, or other sensory stimulus must change before we can perceive a difference. According to the law, the subjective sensation of a stimulus is proportional to the logarithm of the stimulus intensity. Fechner concluded that most people prefer the golden rectangle, whose width to height is the golden ratio. However, some consider this pure malarkey and have challenged the results.

 

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On October 22, 1964, Jean-Paul Sartre was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature, but turned down the honor. He said that he always declined official honors and that “a writer should not allow himself to be turned into an institution.”

 

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International Caps Lock Day

OCTOBER 22ND IS INTERNATIONAL CAPS LOCK DAY! It’s a whole day dedicated to something that drives most people crazy—text that is written in ALL CAPITALIZED LETTERS. International Caps Lock Day was created in 2000 by Derek Arnold of Iowa. This holiday began as a parody. It was intended to poke fun at those individuals who unnecessarily capitalize letters, words, and phrases. The day became so popular with internet users that it is now celebrated twice a year—on June 28 and on October 22.

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Wednesday:

October 23rd is Medical Assistants Recognition Day.  The third full week of October is Medical Assistants Recognition Week. October is also Organize Your Medical Information Month and National Medical Librarian Month.

 

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On October 23, 1861, U.S. President Abraham Lincoln suspended the writ of habeas corpus in Washington, D.C., for all military-related cases.

 

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The first North American transcontinental air service began between New York City and Los Angeles, California on October 23, 1929.

 

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Ipod Day

It’s hard to believe that on this day back in 2001, a revolutionary gadget was unveiled that would forever change the way the world listens to music. Apple launched its 6.5-ounce portable music player – the iconic iPod. October 23 celebrates a musical milestone – it’s iPod Day. The tiny MP3 music player had a 5 GB hard drive that could hold a whopping 1,000 CD-quality songs, built-in FireWire port and a rechargeable battery that could play up to 10 hours of continuous music. The original iPod went on sale in November at a cost of $399. In 2002, the second generation iPod was introduced, which held up to 4,000 songs. Over the years, the iPod continued to evolve with various design and color changes, larger storage capacity, video cameras, video calling, larger screen and video were added. More than 350 million iPod Classic, Mini, Shuffle, Nano and Touch, have been sold around the world as of September, 2012.

 

crazy about books necklace

TV Talk Show Host Day

TV Talk Show Host Day celebrates and honors all TV Talk Show hosts. This day is celebrated on the birth date of legendary night time talk show host Johnny Carson. Carson is considered the “King of late night television”. He hosted The Tonight Show from 1962 to 1992. His reign lasted a record 29 years, 7 months, 21 days. There were 1,859 episodes. While this day is celebrated on Johnny Carson’s birth date, it is intended to show appreciation to all Television talk show hosts, daytime and nighttime.

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Mole Day

Mole Day is an unofficial holiday celebrated among chemists and chemistry students on October 23, between 6:02 AM and 6:02 PM, making the date 6:02 10/23 in the American style of writing dates. The time and date are derived from Avogadro’s number, which is approximately  6.02×1023, defining the number of particles (atoms or molecules) in one mole of substance, one of the seven base SI units.

Mole Day originated in an article in The Science Teacher in the early 1980s. Inspired by the article, Maurice Oehler, now a retired high school chemistry teacher from Wisconsin, founded the National Mole Day Foundation (NMDF) on May 15, 1991.  Many high schools celebrate Mole Day as a way to get their students interested in chemistry, with various activities often related to chemistry or moles.  This year’s theme is Animole Kingdom.

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Thursday:

Food Day

Food day is a nationwide celebration of healthy, affordable, and sustainably produced food and a grassroots campaign for better food policies. It builds all year long and culminates on October 24. The aim is to help people Eat Real. That means cutting back on sugar drinks, overly salted packaged foods, and fatty, factory-farmed meats in favor of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and sustainably raised protein. Food Day envisions shorter lines at fast-food drive-throughs—and bigger crowds at farmers markets.

 

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United Nations Day

The United Nations was founded October 24, 1945. In 1971 the United Nations General Assembly adopted a further resolution declaring that United Nations Day shall be an international holiday and recommended that it should be observed as a public holiday by all United Nations member states. The day is devoted to making known to peoples of the world the aims and achievements of the United Nations Organization.

 

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World Development Information Day

In 1972, the United Nations General Assembly decided to institute a World Development Information Day coinciding with United Nations Day on October 24th. The object was to draw attention of world public-opinion each year to development problems and the necessity of strengthening international co-operation to solve them. World Development Information Day was first held on October 24, 1973, and has been held on this date each year since then. In recent years many events have interpreted the title of the day slightly differently. These have concentrated on the role that modern information-technologies, such as the Internet and mobile telephones can play in alerting people and finding solutions to problems of trade and development. One of the specific aims of World Development Information Day was to inform and motivate young people and this change may help to further this aim.

 

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Happy Birthday!

Some of the writers born October 21st include:

Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772), Will Carleton (1845), Giuseppe Giacosa (1847), Edogawa Rampo (1894), Nikos Engonopoulos (1907), Martin Gardner (1914), Samuel Khachikian (1923), Ursula K. Le Guin (1929), Frances FitzGerald (1940), Tariq Ali (1943), Ai (1947), Mary Pipher (1947), Shaye J. D. Cohen (1948), Patti Dais (1952), Allen Hoey (1952), and Hal Duncan (1971).

 

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Some of the writers born October 22nd include:

Ivan Bunin (1870), Alfred Douglas (1870), John Reed (1887), John Gould (1908), Doris Lessing (1919), Timothy Leary (1920), Georges Brassens (1921), Ann Rule (1935), John Blashford-Snell (1936), Jean-Pierre Desthuilliers (1939), Deepak Chopra (1946), Kelvin MacKenzie (1946), Debbie Macomber (1948), and Arto Salminen (1959).

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Some of the writers born October 23rd include:

John Russell Bartlett (1805), Robert Bridges (1844), Neltje Blanchan (1865), Marjorie Flack (1897), Aslam Farrukhi (1923), Shamsur Rashman (1929), Vasily Belov (1932), Michael Crichton (1942), Brian Ross (1948), Nick Tosches (1949), Michael Eric Dyson (1958), Nancy Grace (1959), “Weird Al” Yankovic(1959), Randy Pausch (1960), Laurie Halse Anderson (1961), Gordon Korman (1963),  Augusten Burroughs (1965), Alex Finn (1966), Trudi Canavan (1969), Aravind Adiga (1974), and Meghan McCain (1984).

 

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Some of the writers born October 24th include:

Alban Butler (1710), Dorothea von Schlegel (1763), Sarah Josepha Hale (1788),  Alexandra David-Neel (1868), Moss Hart (1904), Bob Kane (1915), Marghanita Laski (1915), Robin Day (1923), Denise Levertov (1923), Hubert Aquin (1929), Yordan Radichkov (1929), Stephen Covey (1932), Adrian Mitchell (1932), Norman Rush (1933), Wolf Rudiger Hess (1937), Frank Delaney (1942), Ray Downs (1944), John Markoff (1949), Gabriella Sica (1950), David Weber (1952), Jane Fancher (1952), Mindy Newell (1953), Dale Maharidge (1956), Dave Meltzer (1959), Ted Dekker (1962), and Robert Wilonsky (1968).

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Disclaimer: 
Much of the information in this blog is taken directly from Wikipedia, Amazon, and other sources such as holidayinsights.com, which are directly linked to within the text.  Images have been taken from various sources found via Facebook, Goodsearch.com and Google.
Village Book Shop and the blogger claim no credit for the information above and no copyright infringement is intended.

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